Revisting the “Great Flip Flop Rescue” at Bayside

9 Jul

There’s been a lot of chatter recently about how Bayside Pub will likely soon be history due to the Town of Webster’s big Sandbar Park Project.

It all made me think back to a warm summer evening five years ago when we joined our friends for dinner — and what became dinner AND a show — at the popular restaurant. I’d like to share the blog I wrote after our memorable adventure.


An entertaining trip to Bayside

(originally published July 18, 2016)

Believe it or not, last night was the very first time my husband and I had ever been to the Bayside Pub up on Lake Road. Our friends Dave and Patty invited us along when they headed up there for dinner. They warned us there’d be a wait for a table, but that we’d enjoy sitting outside with a beer and listening to some music while we did.

They were right on both counts. The wait was long because — as many of you probably already know —  Bayside is quite small and apparently everybody in Webster knows that sitting on the Bayside lawn on a gorgeous summer Sunday evening, drinking a beer and listening to music is THE thing to do.

Before long we were joined by four other friends. We talked, and laughed, and sang along with a very entertaining local cover band called Vintage.

But the best part of the evening was what will forever be known as the Great Flip Flop Rescue.

Allow me to paint the scene. We’re waiting at a table right on the water, and as we’re chatting, I watch as a young girl scampers down the short dock toward her family’s small boat. She stops in front of it and kicks off one of her flip flops, expecting it to land in the boat. Not even close. Instead, it plops into the bay. Undaunted, she kicks off the other flip flop. Which lands in the bay right next to the first one.

She stands there, looks at them, looks around to see if there’s someone who can help, looks at them again. Finally, she heads back down the dock, probably in search of adult assistance.

Eventually, Dad comes by, heads toward the water, looks at the flip flops and walks back towards land with a rather peeved expression. Meantime, our victim scampers back and forth on the dock, flip-flop-less, while the wayward footwear continue to float away.

Before long, a small knot of family members and friends from the neighboring boat has convened on the dock, and the adult strategizing begins. Now all four of us, still waiting for dinner, are closely watching the action, anxious to see how the exciting drama plays out.

One of the flip flops had not yet floated too far away, and somehow they retrieve that one rather quickly. The other one is more problematic.

There is much discussion on the dock. Someone pulls a pike pole out of one of the boats, and extends it to its full length before realizing that it would take about 10 of them to reach the flip flop at this point. Someone starts uncoiling a rope attached to a toddler’s floaty.  Someone else tries casting a fishing rod in its direction.

There is much discussion at our table, too. Like football fans questioning a poor call on the field, we’re wondering why SOMEONE doesn’t think to throw a tube into the water (there’s one tethered to flip-flop-family’s boat) and paddle over to it.

Perhaps she hears us, but it is flip flop girl who finally also has that brilliant thought. Now skittering around in one flip flop, she hops into her boat, pulls the tube up next to the side of the boat, and starts trying to climb in. As soon as she puts one foot on it she realizes that without help, she’ll also be in the water. So instead, she yanks on the rope and, all by herself, wrestles the tube into the boat.

Apparently no one else thinks it’s a brilliant idea, because it just sits there.

FINALLY, neighboring-boat-owner-family figures they might as well head home. So they pull all their kids and stuff together, back their boat out of the dock, putter over to the flip flop, retrieve it and return it to flip flop girl.

There was actual cheering.


The Bayside may someday be gone, but memories like these will always remain.

* * *

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One Response to “Revisting the “Great Flip Flop Rescue” at Bayside”

  1. Cindy & Matt frank July 9, 2021 at 2:36 pm #

    Great story. The bayside will be missed by everyone!!

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