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Webster Museum will host two new young Webster authors

28 Feb
Kathyrn

Kathryn Rider and Emerson Ormond

Two young authors will be at the Webster Library on March 9 to talk about their new book, Our Wendy.

Kathryn Rider, a seventh grader at Willink Middle School, and Emerson Ormond, a ninth grader at Webster Schroeder High School, released their first collaborative novel in December. Best friends for pretty much their entire lives, both young ladies have been writing stories since their childhood.

Based loosely on the famous adventures of Peter Pan, Our Wendy tells the story of a runaway boy named Peter, who’s created a new life in the woods with several other “lost boys.” When pretty, bright-eyed Ever Kingsley stumbles into their camp, Peter is determined to keep her by any means possible, and make her their Wendy Darling.

In their talk, scheduled on March 9 from 1 to 2 p.m., Kathryn and Emerson will discuss our wendythe challenges they had to overcome while writing the book, and the secrets they used to get it published. They’ll have several copies of the books there for sale (and signing), and all proceeds will be donated to the fight against children’s cancer.

The Webster Library is located in the Webster Plaza, 980 Ridge Road.

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Christmas trees galore, thanks to the Webster Museum

4 Dec
IMG_9911

A look at the raffle prizes you can still win at the Webster Museum this week. 

Late yesterday afternoon after I got home from work, I got a very nice phone call from Amy at the Webster Museum. She told me that I had won one of the two Christmas trees that the museum was offering as part of their annual holiday raffle.

I had entered the raffle when I stopped by the museum during White Christmas in the Village on Saturday. So many gorgeous raffle prizes were piled on a table in the museum’s main room, but I was set on winning one of the fat Christmas trees which stood near the front entrance. After all, with the price of cut-your-own trees these days, combined with the hassle of slogging through the mud and snow to get one, I considered the $5 I plunked down for the raffle a good bet.

Turns out it was a very wise investment.

I tell you this story mostly because I want to give a public shout-out and thank you to the Webster Museum for not only hosting the raffle, but also delivering the tree to my door within an hour of when they called. Also, I want to thank Woody Acres in Penfield for donating the tree, and supporting our museum.

The raffle, by the way, is still going on this week. Even if the two trees are gone, there are still plenty of incredible raffle prizes to be won. Cost is just $5 for three entries, which will be accepted through the end of this week.

And while you’re there, make sure to check out the museum’s Festival of Trees. This annual event features adorable little 4-foot tall trees set up throughout the museum, each of which has been adopted and decorated by an individual, family or local organization. I snapped a few photos when I was there to give you an idea of what you’ll find (check out the slideshow below), but you really have to see them all for yourself.

Plus, you have to vote, Serious bragging rights are on the line for the most creative tree.  Votes are being taken through the end of the month.

The Webster Museum is located at 18 Lapham Park in the Village of Webster. They’re open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Call 585-265-3308 for more information.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

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Photos from White Christmas in the Village

2 Dec

IMG_0015Once again we didn’t have a whole lot of white for Webster’s White Christmas in the Village. But I’ll wager that the thousands who came into town for the cookies, wagon rides, caroling and visits with Santa appreciated the unusually warm temperatures.

We could have done without the light rain, though, which began just as the parade started.

Still, it was another successful event. The village looked beautiful, the businesses were all decked out in their holiday finery, and several who remained open throughout the afternoon benefited from a steady flow of holiday shoppers.

Of course I took a lot of photos. Many of them didn’t come out very well because of the low light and wet conditions, but I hope you enjoy what I did manage to get:

Click here to see the gallery. 

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White Christmas in the Village is this weekend

26 Nov

OK folks, now that Thanksgiving is in the rear-view mirror, it’s time to get down to some real holiday celebrating. And it starts this weekend with the Village of Webster’s White Christmas.

fire truck

This annual festival, which takes place this year on Saturday Dec. 1, features horse-drawn wagon rides, a bounce house, cookie decorating, storytelling, carolers, Santa (of course), and the always very popular Electric Parade.

Everything begins at 3 p.m. with activities for adults and children throughout the village. The official schedule looks like this:

3 to 6 p.m. — Horse-drawn wagon rides through the village
3 to 6 p.m. — Bounce House on Main Street
4 to 5:45 p.m. — Santa Claus at the Village Hall
4 p.m. — Storytelling at Yesterday’s Muse Book Store
4 p.m. — Cookie decorating
4:30 p.m. — Rochester Rhapsody Carolers
5 p.m. — Church of the Good Shepherd Chime Bell Choir on Main Street

And do not forget to stop by the Webster Museum that afternoon as well to check out — and vote for — some beautiful miniature Christmas trees.

santaThe Electric Parade will begin at 6:30 p.m. at Phillips Road and head west down Main Street. This spectacular parade features fire engines, floats and marching bands, all draped in thousands of twinkling Christmas lights. You’ll definitely want to bring the kids, but dress warm, and pack a thermos of hot chocolate, because this is a pretty long parade. Fireworks will follow the parade at 8:15.

(Click here to see a gallery of photos from last year’s White Christmas celebration.)

By the way, don’t forget to start out that morning with a hot breakfast, served up by the Chorus of the Genesee.

The Chorus will be hosting their third annual Breakfast with Santa, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Harmony House, 58 East Main Street in Webster.

Breakfast will be cooked and served, music will be provided by the Chorus of the Genesee, and of course, Santa will be there! Tickets are just $5 each, with a maximum of $20 per family. To purchase a photo with Santa is just $20.

For more information or to make reservations, call (585) 265-9540.

This is a good chance to visit with Santa before everyone else descends on him when he’s at Village Hall later in the day.

AND BY THE WAY …

When you’re in the village this weekend, make sure to visit some of our village businesses and knock off some Christmas shopping. Two brand new stores opened recently on East Main Street, The Pickled Paintbrush and Lala: Laugh and Love, Always.  And on Saturday a third new business came to town, The North Bee on North Ave. This cute shop offers local honey and hand-crafted items made from beeswax. I’ll be blogging more about them later this week, so stay tuned!

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Halloween in the Village is coming!

18 Oct

halloween

It took a while, but I finally have gotten into the Halloween mood. Perhaps it was visiting Victor last weekend, seeing all of their light pole scarecrows and making plans with friends to attend Victor’s very adult trick-or-treating Spooktacular in a few weeks. Maybe it’s that the weather has turned very fall-like (OK, downright cold) and the trees are really beginning to change.

In any case, let’s talk Halloween.

The Village of Webster’s annual Halloween in the Village is coming up on Saturday October 27. The highlight of this event is the Trick-or-Treat Trail, where kids can get into their costumes and trick-or-treat all through the village, stopping by dozens of businesses for treats.

Here are the details:

  • A costume contest will kick off the day’s activities from 11 a.m. to noon at the Community Meeting Room, 29 South Ave. (adjacent to the fire house). Prizes will be awarded for best costumes. To be entered into the contest, you must arrive between 11 and 11:30.
  • The Trick-or-Treat Trail itself will run from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Look for the orange pumpkin in the windows of the participating businesses. (Or just follow the crowds of kids.)
  • The Webster Museum on Lapham Park will host an open house and usually has a fun scavenger-hunt for the kids.
  • The Fire Department will also have an open house, which is always very popular with the kids. Along with candy and other treats, the firefighters will be handing out fire hats and goodie bags and will have lots of demonstrations and hands-on activities.
  • The village’s Festival Wagon will also be making the rounds if you’d like to enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride around the village.

I’ll be there with my camera, as I am every year, snapping photos of as many cute kids as I can. If you’d like to check out last year’s gallery of photos, click here.

Several other events you’ll want keep on your radar include the Friends of Webster Trails’ annual Hot Cocoa Hike the evening of Oct. 27; Barry’s Old School Irish’s 7th anniversary party on Saturday Nov. 3; a craft show at Schlegel Elementary School also on Nov. 3; and a magic show to benefit Miracle Field on Saturday Nov. 24. More details to come about all these soon.

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Images from the Living History Tour

22 Sep

IMG_9395

I had a chance Saturday afternoon to pop by Webster Union Cemetery and catch the final half hour of the Living History Tour sponsored by the cemetery and the Webster Museum.

The event was an opportunity for local history buffs to “meet” and chat with several of Webster’s citizens from olden times, portrayed by museum volunteers. They included John Fielding Whiting, Charles and Sabrina Wright, Helen Tompkins, Mark Curtice, Mae Strowger Wright, Jennie Strowger Woodhull, and Abram and Patience Woodhull Foster.

The event’s organizers were positively giddy about how successful the day was. They estimated about 100 people — adults and children — visited the tour’s half dozen or so stops, taking photos and videos, and listening intently to the actors.

The gorgeous first-day-of-autumn weather might have had something to do with the large turnout, but I like to think there are simply a lot of people here in town who care about our local history. I’m sorry that I wasn’t able to attend the entire tour, but am hoping that the Webster Museum will consider doing another one of these next year.

By then, the volunteers’ voices will have rebounded, after their non-stop afternoon of talking.

Here’s a short slide show of some of those volunteers.

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History, miniatures and music

14 Sep

Three really cool events are coming up next weekend, and I want to give you a heads-up about them now so you can get them on your calendar.

museum tour

First, on Saturday Sept. 22, the Webster Museum and the Webster Union Cemetery are joining forces for a Living History Tour at the cemetery.

The tour, which takes place from 1 to 4 p.m., will introduce you to several of Webster’s citizens from the past, played by museum volunteers. You’ll hear their stories and be able to ask questions about what their lives were like back when our town was young.

Click here to read a more detailed blog about the event, including the people you will be meeting. Webster Union Cemetery is located at 345 Webster Road (Rt. 250 at Woodhull). A $5 donation would be appreciated.

On Sunday Sept. 23, ROC City Scale Modelers will host their 37th annual ROCON scale model show and contest, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Webster Recreation Center, 1350 Chiyoda Drive.

If you’re even a lukewarm fan of scale models, you have to see this show. The Rec Center’s gymnasium is lined with tables displaying hundreds upon hundreds of miniatures including aircraft, auto, armor, figures, ships, juniors, fantasy and more. For those who choose to enter models, the cost is $10 for 1-3 entries for adult modelers, $2 for each additional model, and $1 each for junior entry (15 years and under). You can register when you get there.

For those who simply enjoy modeling as a hobby, there are also a lot of vendors at this event offering the latest books and gadgets. Basically, it’s a modeler’s paradise.

Once again, ROCON 37 will take place Sunday Sept. 23 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Webster Recreation Center, 1350 Chiyoda Drive. General admission is $5 and children under 12 are free.  Click here for more information

 

rhapsody

Finally, how about extending your weekend with a song?

On Monday Sept. 24, Webster’s own Rochester Rhapsody will be holding open rehearsals for women of all ages.

Rochester Rhapsody, the Rochester chapter of Harmony, Incorporated, is an international organization of female a cappella singers specializing in the barbershop harmony style.

Female guests can “FALL in Love with A Cappella” at the Harmony House, 53 E. Main St. on Monday Sept. 24 from 7:30 to 9 p.m., during the group’s open rehearsals. If you can’t make it that Monday, you can stop in also on October 1 and 8.

Women of all ages can participate in vocal warm-ups and exercises in a relaxed environment, learn new songs, meet with other women, and enjoy an evening of singing and camaraderie.

“If you like to sing but haven’t had much experience, we’ll help you find your voice,” said director Sue Melvin. “The beautiful harmonies, when shared, bind us together. I’m very proud to be a part of this group…it’s more like a family than just friends. It’s ordinary women coming together to make extraordinary music.”

The 3-week event will culminate in a concert performed for the local community on October 15 at Harmony House at 7:30 p.m. All of the guests who have attended open rehearsals will be invited to join in the performance.

For more information about “FALL in Love with a Cappella,” and about the chorus itself, click here. a copy of our flyer or information on Rochester Rhapsody chorus, email info@rochesterrehapsody.com or call 585-865-2731.

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History comes alive with cemetery tour

25 Aug

museum tour

Here’s a heads-up about a very interesting and educational event being held by the Webster Museum in a few weeks.

It’s a living history tour at Webster Union Cemetery (Rt. 250 at Woodhull Rd.) on Saturday September 22. From 1 to 4 p.m., you can tour the cemetery and get a chance to meet with many of Webster’s citizens from the past, played by museum volunteers.

The above photo is one example of the fascinating costumed interpreters you will meet. Minerva Strowger, granddaughter of Abram Foster, was one of Webster’s earliest settlers. Minerva (AKA Gwen Hoffman, Webster Museum volunteer) lived in Webster from 1830-1904. She was married to Charles Strowger and had two children, Johnny who died at age 14 and May. Minerva and her daughter May ran a boarding house on Lake Road, but May was most notable for establishing the hotel and restaurant that would become Hedges Nine Mile Point on the land she inherited from her mother.

Other personalities you can chat with include John Fielding Whiting, Charles and Sabrina Wright, Helen Tompkins, Mark Curtice, Mae Strowger Wright, Jennie Strowger Woodhull, and Abram and Patience Woodhull Foster.

What a neat way to learn about Webster’s history — I’m thinking the kids would even get something out of this presentation.

The tour, once again, will take place Saturday September 22, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Webster Union Cemetery, 345 Webster Road (Rt. 250 at Woodhull). A $5 donation would be appreciated.

And remember that history is front and center all the time at the Webster Museum, 18 Lapham Park in the village. The Museum is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4:30 p.m.

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Historic properties to be recognized at Town Board meeting

7 May
sharon pratt

Sharon Pratt with an example of the plaques awarded every year.

The Town of Webster has a rich history, reflected in part by the many historic homes and businesses which are still standing, and in great shape.

For ten years now, the Historic Properties Committee of the Webster Museum and Historical Society has worked to recognize these buildings, and the owners who have put time and effort into maintaining them so they still retain their original charm.

Every May since 2008, the committee has presented commemorative plaques to a selection of these historic homes.

The plaque program grew out of a survey of historic properties which a small group of museum volunteers tackled about 18 years ago. They were looking especially for any homes which still had enough of their historical integrity that their original owners would still recognize them.

Museum secretary Sharon Pratt was one of those volunteers.

There were “more than we ever thought,” she said. Hundreds, even. So many that it took them a few years to compile their information, going to each house in turn, filling out a form and taking photos. In 2007 they decided take all that information and propose a commemorative plaque program to the town. It would be a great way to recognize the town’s visual history, they argued, and a way for the town to say thank you to the homeowners who are caring for that history.

The town agreed. In 2008 the committee handed out its first 10 plaques, and have continued the program with the Town’s blessing every year since.

Most of the 65 plaques that have been presented so far have gone to homes in the Town of Webster. Two years ago, however, the committee decided it was time to include the village as well. The first two village properties to be recognized were Holy Trinity Church and 135 East Main Street, a home which held the village’s first hospital.

This year, the committee will be presenting six more plaques, four to Town of Webster homes, and two to village properties.

The presentation will take place on Thursday May 17 during the regular meeting of the Webster Town Board, at 7:30 p.m. at Webster Town Hall, 1000 Ridge Road.

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