Tag Archives: Webster museum

Webster community mailbag

23 Sep

I’d like to lead this week’s mailbag with a huge THANK YOU from the Webster Museum.

The recent Museum Barn Sale, held Sept. 15 to 17, was a tremendous success, reportedly the best ever. Museum volunteers would like to thank the Webster community for all the donations, purchases and “delightful company.”

Your support for this — the organization’s biggest fundraiser of the year — assures that the Webster Museum will be with us for another year, carefully preserving our town’s rich history.

The Webster Museum is located at 18 Lapham Park in the Village of Webster, and is open Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday from 2 to 4:30 p.m.


In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, the Webster Public Library brings these two events your way:

  • Hispanic Heritage Month Night, Thursday Sept. 29 from 6 to 8 p.m. Celebrate the month with a culture-filled evening of food, dance, music, crafts and more. All ages are welcome, and registration is requested. (Click here)
  • Hispanic Heritage Month Crafts, Saturday Sept. 30, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. All ages are welcome, drop in anytime and no registration is required.

Also from the library, their big Fall Book Sale is right around the corner.

It happens Thursday through Saturday Oct. 6 to 8, with the best deals saved for Friday and Saturday. Check out all the details in the flyer below.

If your kids are REALLY into fire trucks, then you’ll want to mark these dates on your calendar.

The West Webster Fire Department will hold their open house on Sunday Oct. 16 from 1 to 4 p.m., and the Webster Volunteer Fire Department will hold their open house on Saturday Oct. 29 (during Halloween in the Village). These events offer much more than fire trucks, too. There are demonstrations, giveaways, a chance to check out all sorts of emergency equipment and talk to real first responders. But of course, there’s definitely plenty of opportunities to take a picture of your young firefighter sitting in a real fire truck.

The West Webster Fire Department is at 1051 Gravel Rd., and the Webster Volunteer Fire Department is on South Ave. in the Village of Webster. These events are both free and open to everyone.


Gleason Orthodontics, on South Ave. in the village, will be hosting a winter-wear donation drive from Oct. 1 through Nov. 20.

You can drop off adult and youth-sized coats, hats and gloves at the office, 246 South Ave., during regular business hours.

The Webster Recreation Center, Webster Central PTSA and Webster Teachers Association are also hosting a Concert Apparel and Coat Drive. They’re looking for any size (toddler through adult) of the following items in good condition:

  • Winter coats, jackets, pants, boots and accessories
  • Concert apparel: white and black tops, shoes, bottoms and accessories

Collection boxes are loated at each Webster Central School building through Oct. 27.

On Saturday Oct. 29 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Webster Recreation Center, 1350 Chiyoda Dr., anyone who needs winter or concert gear can come “shop” for gently-used items for free.


The Webster Aquatic Center will be hosting a Blood Drive on Tuesday Sept. 27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Aquatic Center, 875 Ridge Rd.

Call 1-800-RED-CROSS or log onto RedCrossBlood.org to make an appointment.

 * * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 9/23/2022)

Webster community mailbag

14 Sep

I’m going to begin today’s mailbag with lots of stuff from the Webster Public Library. I haven’t blogged about them much recently, but it’s NOT because there’s nothing going on over there. Actually, there are so many new programs happening at the library, I’m just going to kind of list them, and you can get even more detail from the flyers posted below.

  • Thursday Sept. 15, from 6:30 to 8 p.m.: Classical Guitar Salon. Bring your guitar and meet other guitarists of all ages to socialize, share and perform. Registration is requested.
  • Saturday, Sept. 17, from 2 to 3 p.m.: a parenting program from Parent to Parent called Understanding OPWDD Support Services (Office for People with Developmental Disabilities). Especially for parents of children with developmental disabilities.
  • Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 2 to 3 p.m.: Practical Tips for Aging in Place, a discussion offering practical tips, strategies and home modifications to allow you — or your loved ones — to age in place. Registration is required.
  • Thursday Oct. 6 through Saturday Oct. 9, the Webster Public Library Fall Book Sale returns, with an incredible variety of books at more incredible prices. More to come about this, but check out the flyer below for more information.

Here are some follow-up reminders about some things I’ve already blogged in more detail about. If you’re interested in any of them, click through to the original blog.

  • The Webster Recreation Center has two family-friendly events this week. The first is a concert at the Arboretum on Thursday Sept. 15 at 6 p.m., featuring the wonderful folk/pop duo Doctor’s Orders. Bring chairs, a blanket (it’s getting cooler in the evenings) and a cooler if you want. There’s no admission fee.
  • On Saturday Sept. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon, the Rec will hold its second annual Mud Run, a fun one-mile, non-competitive run through mud and obstacles. I’m definitely going to be there this year. Cost is $5/person for lots of laughs.
  • The Red Hot and Blue Band will hold a benefit concert at the village gazebo on Sunday Sept. 18, beginning at 3 p.m. There’s no admission fee, but free will donations will be taken at the concert, with all proceeds to benefit St. Jude Children’s Hospital.
  • Get your German on at the Challenger Miracle Field Oktoberfest, Friday and Saturday Sept. 16 and 17, Webster Firemen’s Field. The two-day event runs from noon to 10 p.m. each day and will have lots of great German bands and German food. Admission is $9, free for children 12 and under.

And finally, don’t forget about two big garage sales happening this weekend.

The Webster Hope, Inc. Garage Sale is going on today through Saturday Sept. 17 at Holy Trinity Church, 1460 Ridge Rd. Webster. And the annual Webster Museum Barn Sale runs Thursday, Sept. 15 through Saturday Sept. 17 on Phillips Rd. Click here to read about this incredible sale, which is the museum’s largest fundraiser of the year.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 9/14/2022)

It’s FINALLY Barn Sale time!

13 Sep

I’ve long been impressed by the volunteers at the Webster Museum. The challenges they tackle every week curating, organizing, sorting, setting up displays, serving as docents — all designed to keep Webster’s history alive for us all — take a lot of work and incredible dedication. But all that pales in comparison to the monumental task these volunteers tackle every year at Barn Sale time.

For weeks, the museum invited community members to drop their donations off at the barn on Phillips Rd. in anticipation of the sale, which takes place later this week. When I drove by a few weeks ago to drop some stuff off, I had a chance to pop into the big barn.

The sight was overwhelming. Toys and dishes and tools and books and dolls and home decorations were EVERYWHERE, stacked on tables in piles and boxes. I’m sure the barn sale volunteers could see some method to the madness, but all I saw was an organizational challenge of monumental proportions.

Over the last couple of weeks, however, these amazing folks tackled that challenge and turned confusion into orderliness, evidenced by the email I recently got from museum volunteer Kathy Taddeo. She provided a tantalizing example of some of the beautiful items shoppers will find at the sale: an elegant teacup and saucer collection, and a Boyd Bears collection.

They’re just a few of the thousands of items shoppers will discover, so many that they’ll not only fill the big barn, but also the carriage house and two adjacent barns, and even spill out onto the lawns.

Shoppers will find glassware, crafts, ceramics, lamps, dolls and jewelry, holiday wares, outdoor and garden care, books, music, electronics, paintings, toys and games, sports equipment, furniture, bikes and trikes, auto, tools and hardware and more, at really low prices.

The sale will run Thursday and Friday Sept. 15 and 16 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday Sept. 17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 394 Phillips Rd.  Please bring your own shopping bags and small bills!!!! This is the Webster Museum’s biggest fundraiser of the year, so come ready to shop!

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 9/13/2022)

History Bit: Rules for teachers, circa 1872

4 Sep

So I got a new job recently.

Beginning this month, I’ve taken over the job of writing the monthly “Bit of Webster History,” a short feature produced by the Webster Museum highlighting interesting historical tidbits from around our town.

For the last six years, these “Bits” have been researched and written by Webster Museum volunteer Kathy Taddeo. She’s a great writer and I always enjoyed seeing what gems she came up with every month. Needless to say, I have some big shoes to fill.

Here’s my first stab at it:

A Bit of Webster History — Rules for Teachers

In honor of the first week of school and our hard-working teachers, this month’s History Bit takes us back to a time when school was held for all grades in one room heated by a wood stove, writing was done on slates, and the drinking fountain was a metal pail and cup. 

The first school recorded within the township of Webster was a log cabin at the corner of Salt and State roads in 1813. In those days the school year was typically divided into summer and winter terms. Usually a woman would teach girls and young children in the summer, and a man would teach the older boys in the winter after they were released from farm work. 

It was a tough job with some pretty strict rules – and not just with regards to classroom management. Consider this list of Rules for Teachers from 1872:  

  1. Teachers each day will fill lamps, clean chimneys
  2. Each teacher will bring a bucket of water and a scuttle of coal for the day’s session
  3. Make your pens carefully. You may whittle nibs to the individual taste of the pupils. 
  4. Men teachers may take one evening each week for courting purposes, or two evenings a week if they go to church regularly. 
  5. After ten hours in school, the teachers may spend the remaining time reading the Bible or other good books. 
  6. Women teachers who marry or engage in unseemly conduct will be dismissed. 
  7. Every teacher should lay aside from his pay a goodly sum of his earnings for his benefit during his declining years so that he will not become a burden on society. 
  8. Any teacher who smokes, uses liquor in any form, frequents pool or public halls, or gets shaved in a barber shop will give good reason to suspect his worth, intention, integrity and honesty.
  9. The teacher who performs his labor faithfully and without fault for five years will be given an increase of 25 cents per week in his pay, providing the Board of Education approves. 

See the list for yourself at the Webster Museum, where it’s posted just outside the museum’s classroom, which emulates how an actual one-room schoolhouse might have looked in the early 1900s.

The museum, located at 18 Lapham Park, is open Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Visit the website for more historical tidbits about our town’s schools and teachers.

(P.S. The photo above pictures one of the district’s earliest schools, the District No. 7 school on Schlegel Rd., circa 1846.)

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 9/4/2022)

News from the museum: huge sale and shipwreck program redux

29 Aug

Two big museum-sponsored events are coming up in the next several weeks you’ll want to know about.

The first is the museum’s annual Barn Sale, scheduled for Sept. 15-17 at — well, a barn — at 394 Phillips Rd. It’s a huge barn, but already there have been so many donations that organizers know they’ll definitely be spilling out onto the lawns surrounding the barn, plus the carriage house and two additional adjacent barns.

Among the thousands of items you’ll find are glassware, crafts, ceramics, lamps, dolls and jewelry, holiday wares, outdoor and garden care, books, music, electronics, paintings, toys and games, sports equipment, furniture, bikes and trikes, auto, tools and hardware and more all at very low price points.

The sale will run Thursday and Friday Sept. 15 and 16 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday Sept. 17 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Please bring your own shopping bags!!!! All proceeds will benefit the all-volunteer Webster Museum.

Donations are still being accepted, by the way. You can just drop them off at the barn anytime before Labor Day.


Next month, the museum and Webster Public Library will feature a fascinating program by shipwreck explorer Jim Kennard, hosted at the library.

Kennard will take everyone along his personal journey and his underwater explorations of Lake Ontario, sharing stories he’s gathered while researching and locating the most historically significant shipwrecks of our Great Lakes. These include the 1780 British warship HMS Ontario and the sloop Washington lost in 1803.

Kennard has also authored a book, Shipwrecks of Lake Ontario: A Journey of Discovery, which can be borrowed from the library. He’s been featured in local publications as well as National Geographic, national and local news stations, the Discovery Channel and most recently National Geographic’s “Drain the Oceans” series on the American Revolution.

Kennard will share stories gathered over those 50 years while researching and locating the most historically significant shipwrecks in our Great Lakes. These include the 1780 British warship HMS Ontario and the sloop Washington lost in 1803.

The program will be held Saturday Sept. 24 from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd.   Attendees must register for this event by calling the library at 585-872-7075 or by using the library’s program registration link here.

This program was originally scheduled for May at the Harmony House but had to be postponed.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/29/2022)

Webster community mailbag

19 Aug

Yeee Haaaa!!! There’s a ro-DAY-o comin’ to town, and it’s gonna mean some SWELL eatin’!

For those of you who don’t know cowboy-speak, what I mean to say is that the Webster Marching Band’s annual Food Truck Rodeo is back this year on Tuesday Aug. 23 at a brand new location (because the Schroeder parking lot is kind of filled with school buses at the moment).

This year’s rodeo will be held at the Webster Firemen’s Field from 4 to 8 p.m. on Tuesday. Among the trucks which will be there are:

  • Macarollin’
  • Tuscan Wood Fired Pizza
  • The Meatball Truck
  • Roc City Sammich
  • Rob’s Kabobs
  • Rob’s Sweet Tooth
  • Eat Greek
  • Effortlessly Healthy
  • Terry’s Tips and Beef
  • Melt Truck
  • Brusters

Proceeds from this delicious event will benefit our 2021 State Champion Webster Marching Band, so bring a big appetite.

I understand the Marching Band will actually be performing at this event, so bring some lawn chairs and make it a family night out. Admission is free.


The Village of Webster would like YOUR opinions on how the village can be improved.

The Webster Economic Development Alliance, in conjunction with the Webster Business Improvement District, is competing for $4.5 million from the NY Forward community revitalization program. As part of the competition process, Webster must submit an application on how we intend to spend $4.5 million in our community.

So the coalition is asking for community input. They’ve put together a short survey, hoping to gather thoughts about things like

• your vision for the downtown area
• where you’d like to see the money invested
• how projects should be prioritized

It’s a quick, 5-minutes or less survey. Click here to take it and to get more information.


The Webster Museum’s huge barn sale is fast approaching, and the donations are piling up. Word is that toys and games, puzzles and stuffed animals have taken over one whole corner of the donation barn at 394 Phillips Rd.

There’s still time for you to add your donations to the pile, but please do so by Sept. 5 (Labor Day). You can just drive by the barn and leave your donations inside. The museum welcomes household goods, tools, toys, pottery, collections, books, music, games, etc.  Think small and easy to lift. Please DO NOT leave large furniture, clothing, shoes, computers, exercise equipment or skis.

The sale itself will take place at the barn on Phillips Rd. from Sept. 15-17. More details to come about that.

Questions? Call Jan Naujokas 585-265-3268.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/19/2022)

A bit of history about the History Bit

5 Aug

My regular blog readers are familiar with the monthly “Bit of Webster History” features, courtesy the Webster Museum, which I will often post.

In recent months, topics have run the gamut from famous people (like Merton Lewis and Esther Dunn) and monsters at the museum to the history of Ridge Rd. and the Forest Lawn neighborhood. I even saw one from a while ago about hanging laundry.

For the last six years, these fascinating historical nuggets have been researched and written by Webster Museum volunteer Kathy Taddeo, who this month has put the spotlight on the Bits themselves.

She wrote,

“(The) March 4, 1938 edition of the Webster Herald was one of the first issues to carry the column we now know as ‘A Bit of Webster History.’ This means the column has been part of the Herald for 84 of its 123 years, written by historians and museum volunteers for the enjoyment of Herald readers.”

Here’s a look at the column from that day, from New York Historic Newspapers:

Kathy’s a great writer and I’ve always enjoyed seeing what little historical surprises she manages to dig up. But after six years, Kathy has decided to hand the Bit of Webster History reins to someone else, who will take over beginning next month and continue the long tradition.

So let’s all have a round of applause for Kathy’s great work, and stay tuned in the next several weeks to see who’ll be trying to fill her very capable shoes. (Some of you might be able to guess who that will be.)

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/5/2022)

Webster community mailbag

19 Jul

I’d like to start today with this very interesting History Bit from the Webster Museum, which tells a bit of history of the Forest Lawn neighborhood, on the very northern end of town.

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE!

(submitted by Kathy Taddeo)

Webster is very fortunate in its location. Not only is it bordered by Lake Ontario on its north and Irondequoit Bay on its West, but it is blessed with numerous creeks and streams. All add color, texture, sound and wildlife to our daily lives.

It’s not surprising, then, that waterfront property has been prized since Webster’s pioneer days and that there are several cottage enclaves along lake, bay and streams. One of these is Forest Lawn on Lake Ontario and Shipbuilders Creek.

By 1857, friends Samuel Pierce and John Forsyth had completed a plan for a summer community in the northwest corner of Webster. Later, Horace Pierce and George Forsyth talked the local trolley company into extending its line so residents could hop a trolley after work and meet their families at the community known as Forest Lawn. The definitive history of Forest Lawn was written by yet another Forsyth, Judge C. Benn. His FOREST LAWN 1888-1988 is available to read at the Webster Museum library and to borrow from the Webster Public Library.

By 1888, the Forest Lawn Club was incorporated, the cottage lots claimed and the clubhouse had become the center of social activity. The clubhouse burned down for the second time in 1908 and never rebuilt. However, the spirit of community was strong and for many years, the neighbors carried on the Forest Lawn Field Day with croquet and softball and dancing behind the store. One Forest Lawn song was sung to the tune of “Harrigan.”
     F-O-R-E-S-T-L-A-W-N, Forest Lawn
     That’s the place we like to praise, sir.
     That’s the spot which we most craze sir.
      F-O-R-E-S-T-L-A-W-N, Forest Lawn
     Ring the bell, let it swell
     Wake the echoes through lawn and dell –
      Forest Lawn, that’s here!

Around 1914-1918, Isabella and Thomas Dorsey rented a home in a Forest Lawn farm, likely the Glasser farm. There they cared for orphaned African-American children. Their neighbors commented that the Dorseys were doing “excellent work.”  In need of more space, the Dorseys moved the children to the current site of McQuaid High School.

Around this time, residents apparently could not get enough of their summer place and seasonal cottages became permanent dwellings. Forest Lawn turned into a neighborhood and a hamlet with its own post office. Though likely few remember much less sing the old field day songs, Forest Lawn remains one of the many beautiful places to live in Webster, New York.

The Webster Museum’s map collection, which sparked this “Bit of Webster History,” is available to you on Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2-4:30 pm at 18 Lapham Park.


The Caring Community Concert series at the United Church of Christ (570 Klem Rd.) is back, and this summer’s lineup is a great one.

These concerts benefit local nonprofit organizations through free-will donations. The first one, scheduled for Wed. July 20 will feature the Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra, and proceeds will benefit Meals on Wheels.

The next concert, on Wed. July 27, features the Gate Swingers Big Band, with proceeds going to the Webster Public Library BookBox. The last, on Wed. Aug. 3, features 8 Days a Week, and will benefit the Webster Community Chest.

The concerts all begin at 6:30 p.m., and food concessions begin at 6. You can bring a picnic or buy dinner or snacks there, served up by church volunteers. The concerts are held on the United Church of Christ front lawn, at 570 Klem Rd. (In case of rain it’s moved indoors.) Bring your own lawn chairs and come enjoy some great music for a good cause!

For more information about the concerts, click here.


Fun stuff coming up in the village in the next few weeks.

  • The Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra comes to the Veterans’ Park gazebo this Friday July 22 for a concert beginning at 7 p.m.
  • The next Family Games and Beer Garden Night is Friday July 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. Plans are to introduce even more games for the older kids this time around.
  • On Friday Aug. 5, It’s My Party will perform at the gazebo, beginning at 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday Aug. 9 is the next Movie in the Park, featuring Flight of the Navigator

And that’s only the beginning. There are more bands, the Jazz Fest, another movie, another Games Night … and you can check out details about all of these on the Webster BID website.


Don’t forget about the Joe Obbie Farmers’ Market’s latest addition: the Evening in the Park market at Charles Sexton Park (formerly North Ponds) every Wednesday from 4 to 8 p.m. Lots of vendors, food trucks, and live music. So don’t just come ro shop for great crafts, flowers and fresh vegetables; bring some lawn chairs and make an evening out of it.

Check out the poster below for information about the entertainers.


Finally, you don’t want to miss this great event coming up at Miracle Field on Saturday July 23, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

It’s Hero’s Day, when Challenger athletes take the field to play some ball games with — and against — our first responders. There’s lots of refreshments, a dunk tank, kids’ obstacle course, and baseball games all morning. Your kids will also get to meet many of our first responders and check out some of their equipment.

There’s no charge, but there’s plenty of fun and excitement.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 7/19/2022)

Webster community mailbag

17 Jun

Are you headed to the Jazz Fest this weekend?

Schroeder Jazz Ensemble is playing Saturday June 18 at 5 p.m. on the Gibbs Street Stage. Make sure to stop by if you’re nearby and cheer these young people on (and their music teachers, Mrs. Cole and Mr. Lindblom!)

A food truck rodeo and vendor fair being held on Tuesday, June 21 will benefit our Webster Girl Scouts and the great programs they offer.

The rodeo will be held at Willink Middle School, 900 Publishers Parkway, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. on June 21, and feature:

  • Bay Vista Taqueria
  • Mrs. D’s Empanadas
  • Pub 235
  • Rob’s Sweet Tooth
  • Tuscan Wood Fired Pizza

Tons of vendors will also be there (check out the poster for that list), community agencies will have information booths, and live entertainment will be provided by Brian Roode. Make sure to bring some lawn chairs.

Sounds like good food, good music, and a fabulous way to help the Girl Scouts (they do so much more than sell cookies)!


This happy news, from the Webster School District, is another great illustration of all of the good things our young people are doing for our community.

The students of Spry Middle School recently presented a check for $2,107.76 to officials from Challenger Miracle Field, representing donations received through several Spirit Week events.

The Spry Student Council chooses a charity every year to benefit from various Spirit Week competitions. This year they hosted jar wars (a competition to collect loose change), restaurant nights at Panera and Bill Gray’s, and as a culminating activity, a kickball game.

The kickball game was played several weeks ago at Miracle Field itself. The game blended Spry students with Challenger players on each of Spry’s house teams. Following the game, the coveted Spirit Stick was presented to the White House team, which earned the most points from all of the week’s events.

Admission to the kickball game and concessions, added to the week’s earlier fundraising efforts, drove the final Challenger Miracle Field donation total to more than than $2,100.

And that was in just one week. Pretty cool. Nice job, Spry!


The Village of Webster’s Family Game Nights are Back!

The first Family Games & Beer Garden Night of the summer is scheduled for Friday June 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. on West Main St. There’s going to be tons for the kids (and game-loving adults) to do, including sidewalk chalk, Giant Jenga, Giant Connect Four and cornhole. Chad the DJ will provide music, and Kaitlyn from TozziYoga will be there to get everyone moving.

Plus, there’s beer. Did I mention that?

For more information about this and other upcoming village events, like the Movie Nights at the Gazebo, the next Village Wine Walk, Friday Night Concerts and more, visit the Webster BID website.


Don’t forget about this Sunday’s West Webster Cemetery Tour, your chance to learn more about West Webster history, and some of the people who lived there … and are buried there.

On Sunday June 19, from 2 to 4 p.m., the Webster Museum will host an historical tour of the West Webster Cemetery, featuring a dozen reenactors portraying many of the former residents who now rest there. The characters will be hanging out by their gravestones, awaiting visitors to wander by and hear their stories.

I’ll be there, portraying Martha Cottreall, who died in 1934 at the age of 72. I’ll talk about my life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and especially about the accomplishments of my husband — who participated in a famous Arctic rescue operation — and son, who fought in WWI.

Tour visitors will also hear from Angelina Aldridge (wife of John O. Aldridge), Ebenezer Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Drake, and Sylvester Brewer (who will talk about the Civil War and the Army of the Grand Republic), and many others.

It should be a fascinating way to learn more about our town’s oldest cemetery, and to hear some of the memories of West Webster’s past, spoken by voices of the present.

There’s no charge to attend the event, but donations are always gratefully accepted. Attendees are being asked to park at St. Rita’s Church, across Maple Dr. from the cemetery. NO PARKING signs will be posted along Old Ridge Rd. and Maple Dr.

If you’d like to learn more about the cemetery before Sunday’s tour, you’re invited to attend a presentation at the museum on Saturday, June 18 at 2 p.m. when Peter Elder will talk about the cemetery’s history.

The Webster Museum is located at 18 Lapham Park in the Village of Webster. It’s open 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 6/17/2022)

West Webster history will come alive this month during museum’s cemetery tour

2 Jun

The Webster Museum has come up with a very interesting and fun way to learn more about West Webster history, and some of the people who lived there … and are buried there.

On Sunday June 19, from 2 to 4 p.m., the museum will host an historical tour of the West Webster Cemetery, featuring a dozen reenactors portraying many of the former residents who now rest there. The characters will be hanging out by their gravestones, awaiting visitors to wander by and hear their stories.

What’s going to be really fun about this day is that I have volunteered to be one of the reenactors. I chose to portray Martha Cottreall, who died in 1934 at the age of 72. I’ll talk about my life in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and especially about the accomplishments of my husband — who participated in a famous Arctic rescue operation — and son, who fought in WWI. (If you ever wanted to meet me, this would be a great chance!)

Tour visitors will also hear from Angelina Aldridge (wife of John O. Aldridge), Ebenezer Cook, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Drake, and Sylvester Brewer (who will talk about the Civil War and the Army of the Grand Republic), among others.

It should be a fascinating way to learn more about our town’s oldest cemetery, and to hear some of the memories of West Webster’s past, spoken by voices of the present.

There’s no charge to attend the event, but donations are always gratefully accepted. Attendees are being asked to park at St. Rita’s Church, across Maple Dr. from the cemetery. NO PARKING signs will be posted along Old Ridge Rd. and Maple Dr.

If you’d like to learn more about the cemetery before Sunday’s tour, you’re invited to attend a presentation at the museum on Saturday, June 18 at 2 p.m. when Peter Elder will talk about the cemetery’s history.

The Webster Museum is located at 18 Lapham Park in the Village of Webster. It’s open 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 6/2/2022)