Tag Archives: Webster Public Library

Webster community mailbag

10 May

I was going to put this mailbag off for a couple more days, but I just heard news of a great fundraiser happening on Friday night, and I don’t want anyone to miss out.

It’s a big kickball game hosted by Spry Middle School on Friday night May 13 at Rochester Challenger Miracle Field, located on Ridge Rd. behind Town Hall. (Parking is off of Van Ingen Drive.) Three dozen Spry students will be playing, representing the school’s three houses (red, white and blue). Each house team will also include two Challenger players.

The kickball game is the culminating event of this year’s Spirit Week at Spry. Each year the school’s Student Council chooses a charity to benefit from a Spirit Week competition. Usually the game is basketball, but Challenger Miracle Field was chosen this year, so kickball seemed more appropriate.

The game will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. Admission is $5 per person, and concessions will be available for just $1. There’s plenty of free parking. All proceeds from admission and concessions will benefit Challenger Miracle Field.

Make plans to stay around after the game. That’s when the Spirit Stick will be awarded to the house which has accumulated the most spirit points all week — including extra points for winning kickball!


I found out about ALL of the following events in the Webster This Week newsletter, published weekly by the Town of Webster. If you haven’t signed up for this great source of information yet, you should.

Remember that the Webster Public Library’s spring used book sale happens this Thursday through Saturday, May 12-14. Nothing is priced more than $1, and all paperbacks are just 50 cents.

Hours are Thursday 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. to noon. The Webster Public Library is located at 980 Ridge Rd. at the back of the plaza, off of Van Ingen Drive.


Got stuff to shred?

Reliant Federal Credit Union is holding a free shredding event at their Webster branch, 870 Holt Rd., on Saturday May 14 from 9 a.m. to noon.

There are no quantity limits, but everyone is asked to remove file folders, binders and plastic bags. And plan on taking your empty boxes back home with you.

While you’re there, you can take advantage of raffles and giveaways, and enjoy refreshments and entertainment.


Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, 131 W. Main Street in the Village of Webster, is holding a food drive this Saturday May 14 from 10 a.m. to noon.

Donations of non-perishable food, cleaning supplies and personal hygiene items will be used to support the Weekend Food Backpack Program and the church’s Little Free Pantry.


Also on Saturday May 14, the Ukrainian Cultural Center of Rochester, 1040 Jackson Rd., will hold a Sunflowers for Ukraine paint and sip fundraiser event.

Artist Deanna Derhak will guide participants in painting an original sunflower composition using acrylic paint on a 12″ x 12″ canvas. All supplies are included, and yes, there will be wine available.

The event will be held from 5 to 8:30 p.m. Cost is $40. Click here for tickets.


The Webster Volunteer Fire Department is hosting a Vendor Fair and Craft Event on Sunday May 15 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Firemen’s Exempt building, 172 Sanford St. (on the south side of Firemen’s Field).

In addition to the great items for sale, there’ll be crafts, a raffle, 50/50 ticket sales, and a door prize of $100 worth of scratch-off tickets.

Admission is free and there’s lots of parking.


On the other side of town, the West Webster Fire Department is holding a Bike Helmet and Safety Rodeo on Saturday May 21 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

The event, designed for children ages 4 to 14, will feature a bike safety course, helmet fittings and bike safety checks. There’ll be lots of activities, and of course lots of fire trucks! Helmets will be provided on loan for anyone who needs one.

Registration is free. The West Webster Fire Dept. is located at 1051 Gravel Rd.


The Wine Walks are back!

The Village of Webster’s first Wine Walk of the season has been scheduled for Saturday May 21 from 4 to 7 p.m.

Glass pickup will be at Webster Interiors, 975 Ebner Dr. from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Tickets are $15 (plus sales tax and fees) and are available here. For more information, visit the Webster BID website.


The Webster Lions Club will host a Sticky Lips BBQ fundraiser on Thursday May 26 from 3 to 6 p.m. at 1175 Ridge Rd.

Meals will be $15 each, and include a quarter charcoal-cooked chicken, smoked St. Louis ribs, mac salad, BBQ beans and cornbread. You can pay at the event of get pre-sale tickets online at www.StickyLipsBBQFundraisers.com.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 5/10/2022)

Overstuffed Webster community mailbag

20 Apr

The weekly Town of Webster newsletter is always packed with information, and I always get good blog ideas from it. But this week’s edition outdid itself. There are so many events mentioned in its 15 digital pages that it prompted me to post another mailbag, even though the last one was just a few days ago.

So here’s a quick list of what you can see in the newsletter, then I’ll tack on a few more events at the end.

  • The Town of Webster will hold a special ceremony this Friday April 22 to rename North Ponds Park to the Charles E. Sexton Memorial Park in honor of Webster’s first Recreation Director and the first African American Recreation Director in New York State. The ceremony will begin at 4 p.m. at the park. Read more about the event here.
  • The Webster Quilt Guild’s 2022 Quilt Show, called “Envision the Possibilities,” will take place on Saturday and Sunday April 23 and 24 at Holy Trinity Church, 1460 Ridge Rd., just east of the village. There will be several special displays and a raffle. Read more about the event in my blog here.
  • Your chance to meet Adam Traub, the new director of the Webster Public Library, is coming up Wednesday April 27 at the library’s Open House from 3 to 5 p.m. You can read more about Adam in this blog I posted after meeting him.
  • If you’ve ever hiked the Four Mile Creek trails and noticed the old rotting cars in the woods, here’s a great chance to learn about them. The Friends of Webster Trails is holding a “Cars Along the Creek” hike on Saturday April 30 from 10 to noon. There are actually six old cars there (I’ve only seen three) and you’ll learn about all of them. I’ll be posting a blog about this soon, but more details in the flyer below.
  • Also on Saturday April 30, the Webster Health and Education Network is holding a Drug Take-Back Event at both the Holt Rd. and Baytowne Wegmans locations. No appointment is necessary. More details in the flyer below.
  • The Lions Club will hold a Mother’s Day Rose Sale from Thursday May 5 through Saturday May 7. Roses will be $20 per dozen and can be picked up any one of those days, but they must be ordered in advance. For more information, check the flyer below.
  • The Town of Webster will host a blood drive on Tuesday May 10 from noon to 6:30 p.m. at Webster Parks and Recreation on Chiyoda Drive. Call the Red Cross at 1-800-733-2767 or visit redcross.org (search for WebsterCommunity) to schedule an appointment.
  • More news from the Webster Public Library. The Friends of the Library will host their annual spring book sale from Thursday to Saturday May 12 to 14. Nothing costs more than $1. For more details, check the flyer below.
  • Got stuff to shred? Reliant Federal Credit Union is hosting a free Shredding Event on Saturday May 14 from 9 a.m. to noon at their Webster branch, 870 Holt Rd. There’s no quantity limits, but please remove file folders, binders and plastic bags. There will also be raffles and giveaways, refreshments and entertainment.
  • Don’t forget to get your ducks for Webster Comfort Care‘s second annual Duck Derby on Saturday May 21. Cost is $5 per duck, and all proceeds will benefit the home. Click here to read more about this event.
  • The Webster Museum is planning a whole month of programs in May highlighting the rich history of West Webster. I’ll be posting a blog about those events soon, but for some details right now, check out the flyer below.
  • The people of Ukraine still need our help. ROC Maidan is soliciting donations of new clothes and camping cots. Check out the wish list and drop-off locations on the flyer below.

Looking ahead, here are a few other things I’m working on for the coming weeks:

  • The West Webster Cemetery Tour on June 19
  • A new business coming to the Village of Webster
  • the second annual Luminaria Walk for our Webster CSD seniors on May 15
  • Miracle Field Fun Night on May 20

Stay tuned!

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster community mailbag

16 Apr

With the conclusion of Webster Thomas High School’s recent production of Little Shop of Horrors, the final curtain has come down on the high schools’ 2022 spring musical season. But each school actually has a spring drama in the works.

Mark Stoetzel, the drama director at Webster Thomas, emailed me not long ago with some exciting news about their production of The Neighbors, planned for late May: it’s going to be staged outside.

The Webster GeoTech Class is building an outdoor stage in one of the school’s courtyards, complete with a pergola. On May 27 and 28, students will hit the stage to perform several one-act plays they’re writing themselves, each set in a townhouse complex.

More details to come as the date approaches.

The Webster Schroeder Theater Company is also working on a drama, The Secret Garden. Shows are scheduled for Friday and Saturday May 6 and 7 from 7 to 9 p.m. Tickets are available now, but I’m having trouble finding a link or details on how to purchase them. If anyone can fill me in, please email me so I can share that information.


The Webster Museum has all sorts of programs planned in the coming weeks. They seem particularly excited about their upcoming exhibit focusing on the history of West Webster. The little hamlet had its very own zip code not too long ago (14581) and is currently anticipating a revitalization.

Among the materials the museum has collected are the two maps below. The first was drawn by Maguerite Collins around 1938, possibly as a class project. It shows the names of some of Webster’s earliest settlers and when they arrived. The second map, created in 1852, adds more names. 

Descendants of some of these early settlers still live here today, and many of them never left. Interested community members are invited to “meet” some of them on Sunday June 19 from 2 to 4 p.m., when the Webster Museum hosts a West Webster Cemetery Tour. Costumed characters will on hand representing many of the hamlet’s former residents who are buried there, and guaranteed they’ll have some interesting stories.

More information to come about this fun event. (Teaser: I’m going to play a character!)

Stay tuned also for more details about the museum’s upcoming West Webster exhibit. Among the history to be shared will be photos and artifacts from the West Webster Fire Department. It was originally housed in Webb’s garage, then Brewer’s barn, then the former Goetzman Store, followed by its move to its current home on Gravel Road. A number of former West Webster residents have shared memories of turkey raffles, liverwurst sandwiches, craft shows and ice rinks in the firehouse parking lots.

Several programs have been scheduled in May to highlight West Webster history. I’ll tell you all about them in a future blog.

The Webster Museum, located at 18 Lapham Park in the Village of Webster, is open 2 to 4:30 pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.


Here’s what’s happening at the Webster Public Library this month:

Beer lovers will want to be a part of a program scheduled for this Thursday April 21. Will Cleveland, former investigative reporter for the Democrat and Chronicle, will talk about the past and future of the Western New York beer scene, a beat which he has covered since 2014.

The program, called “Rochester Craft Beer: The History and Future of the Scene,” runs from 7 to 8 p.m. and registration is required.

  • Tweens and teens, you can make your very own hair scrunchies on Wed. April 20 from 1 to 2 p.m. Materials will be provided. Kids in grades 4 to 12 are welcome. Registration is required.
  • This month’s make-and-take crafts include recycled milk cap fish (for kids), clothespin peek-a-boo eggs (for teens) and a bead bracelet (made from magazines) for adults. Materials can be picked up at the library during regular business hours while supplies last.

St. Martin’s Lutheran Church’s spring chicken BBQ is coming up Saturday April 30 beginning at 4:30 p.m.

This is a drive-through event. Dinners will include a half chicken, salt potatoes, cole slaw, roll and butter for $12. There will be no advance sales; cars can pay when they enter the parking lot, first come, first served. Signs will direct cars to the pay station, and then to the side entrance where you can pick up the boxed dinners.

Proceeds will support St. Martin’s Christmas Stocking Project which reaches more than 500 youth in Monroe and Wayne counties.


The Tour de Cure is returning to Webster on Saturday June 11, and even if you don’t plan on riding, you can still help out.

In this annual premier cycling event, riders sign up to cycle anywhere from 12 to 100 miles, to benefit the American Diabetes Association. It begins and ends in one of the old Xerox parking lots near the Webster Recreation Center. If you’d like to participate, you can sign up here. Or you can help the cause by becoming a volunteer. More information about those opportunities can be found here.


Finally (and this is especially for all of you who are still reading this long blog, because I know you appreciate local news) I want to draw your attention once again to what’s happening with the Webster Herald.

Our little town newspaper recently experienced another editorial change, when Colin Minster left in March. A new editor, Tim Young, has since taken the reigns, and accepted the daunting challenge of publishing a weekly newspaper.

And it is daunting. I’ve said this before, but it deserves repeating: with a small, hyper-local, weekly publication like the Herald, the editor has to be a Jack-of-all-trades, not only managing the layout and editing, but actively searching out and writing stories of local interest. It’s a 24/7 position from which you can never take a vacation.

The job is made that much more difficult without support from advertisers, contributors and subscribers. I think we can all agree that local news is a dying breed. The Webster Post isn’t around any more, and the Democrat and Chronicle couldn’t care less about Webster local news. The Herald is now one of the few places we can go to to find news about our community. So we need to do everything we can to make sure the Herald doesn’t go anywhere anytime soon.

Tim touched on a few of these concerns in the column he wrote a few weeks ago. Unfortunately, it’s not online anywhere, but you can click here to see a photo of it. In the column, Tim talks about how staffing issues are a challenge and that advertising is hard to come by. He also notes that people are actually complaining about all the legal advertising in the Herald, pointing out that those legals are the only things that are keeping the paper afloat.

It’s not fair to criticize the job a weekly editor is doing without being willing to help do something about it. Like make sure to renew your subscription every year. Encourage your friends to subscribe. Send in sports stories and photos, and your child can be pictured in the paper. Advertise your business. And how about stretching your writing chops and consider becoming a free-lancer? You’ll be paid for your work, and see your own byline in the paper.

Tim would love to hear from you. Email him at tim@empirestateweeklies.com. Let him know that this community is behind him and we still appreciate local news.


Do you know of any event coming up in Webster, or sponsored by a Webster organization, which you’d like publicized in my blog? Pretty much anything that comes across my email will find its way in sometime or another, so let me know about it!

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster community mailbag

26 Mar

I anticipate writing longer blogs about a few of these events in the coming weeks, but in the meantime, here’s a tease so you can get them on your calendars.

One of our town’s most creative and fun FREE family events — the Great Rochester Peep Show — returns Saturday and Sunday April 2 and 3 to the Webster Recreation Center on Chiyoda Drive (off of Phillips).

This fun, completely free, family-friendly event features at least four entire rooms filled with incredibly creative sculptures, dioramas, and various other works of art, all created with marshmallow Peeps candies. In addition to the displays, several entertainers and community groups will be performing.

Hours are 10 to 5 p.m. on Saturday, 10 to 4 on Sunday.


Community Arts Day returns the following weekend after a two-year COVID-induced hiatus.

This year’s event will take place on Saturday, April 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Webster Schroeder High School, 875 Ridge Rd. This very family-friendly festival showcases Webster CSD students’ creative talents and involves the entire community in a day to celebrate the arts.

Dozens of activities are planned throughout the day, including art displays, carnival games, sweet treats sale, plant sale, crafts, community group exhibits and more. Musical groups and demonstrators (dancers, gymnastics, etc.) perform free all day, and you can even grab lunch and snacks.

This is one of my favorite events of the whole year.


Webster’s next American Red Cross blood drive is coming up in just a few weeks. Here are the details:

Tuesday April 5, St. Martin’s Lutheran Church (813 Bay Rd.), 1 to 6 p.m. (Click here to make an appointment)
Wednesday April 6, American Legion (8181 Ridge Rd.), noon to 5 p.m. (Click here for an appointment)

Anyone who donates at one of these drives will receive an exclusive Red Cross t-shirt, while supplies last.

The need right now is critical, so please consider donating!


The Webster Public Library, is hosting a meet-and-greet with new library director Adam Traub on Wednesday April 27 from 3 to 5 p.m. Snacks will be served!


And since we’re talking about the library, next time you’re there, make sure to check out the Webster Museum’s current display. It features square-dancing fashions provided by the Copy Cats Western Square Dance Club, currently celebrating their 50th anniversary. The group was started by Xerox employees.

At the museum itself, at 18 Lapham Park in the village, a new exhibit looks at women’s nineteenth century garments, occupations, voting and working rights efforts, and the story of the “Great Women’s Uprising” of 1910. 

The museum is open 2:30 to 4:30 pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.


This is exciting news.

The Webster Business Improvement District (BID) is sponsoring a FREE Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday April 16 at the Webster Firemen’s Field on West Main St.

Our local merchants will be providing the eggs, filled with prizes and surprises. Children will be divided into three different age groupings for the hunt, and there will be an extra prize basket for the child in each group who finds the golden egg.

The hunt will begin at 10 a.m. More details to come!

This great event is just the first in a long line of special events the Webster BID is working on for this spring and summer, which include a Beer Walk, Bourbon Bash, Family Games Nights, the Trick or Treat Trail, Jazz Fest, Wine Walks and more. Watch for more details about these in an upcoming blog.


The Webster Quilt Guild has an upcoming show.

“Envision the Possibilities” will showcase approximately 250 quilts, plus special displays of quilts created for Breast Cancer Coalition, Quilts of Valor, Bivona Child Advocacy Center, Asbury Storehouse, and Meals on Wheels. Other activities include vendors, boutique table, and book and pattern sale.  The guild will also be collecting non-perishable food items in support of the Webster Backpack Food program. 

The show will be held April 23 and 24 at Holy Trinity Church, 146 Ridge Road. Tickets will be $5, available at the door.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster community mailbag

5 Mar

This is a rather botanical-themed mailbag today, featuring sunflowers, trees and a carnivorous plant that wants to take over the world.

First, something bright and happy. The North Bee wants to flood the community with sunflowers, or sunyashniki, the national flower of Ukraine.

Amy Stringer from The North Bee writes,

For the month of March, 100% of proceeds from the sale of a Beeswax Sunflower Ornament will be donated to ROC Maidan so they can get the funds appropriated to where they are needed to help refugees and soldiers, offer humanitarian aid and help rebuild and recover from this devastation unfolding before our eyes (in Ukraine).

Amy is offering three different designs, the Full Sunflower, Monet Sunflowers, or the Dinner Plate Sunflower. “Whichever you choose,” she added, “I cannot wait to see them displayed everywhere! Come on friends, I’m ready to pour sunflowers all day!”

Click here for more information about this special event and ROC Maidan. The North Bee is located at 27 North Ave. in the Village of Webster.


Here’s a quick look at some of the fun the Webster Public Library has in store this month:

  • Bad Art Night, Friday March 25 from 6 to 7 p.m., for tweens and teens grades 4-12. The library will provide the supplies, you bring the creativity to make some crazy art. Click here to register.
  • Space, eclipses and all things in the sky, Tuesday March 29, 7 to 8 p.m. for all ages. Local space enthusiast Gaylon Arnold will talk about upcoming eclipses that will be viewable in our area, and other space events that might interest you during 2022 and beyond. Click here to register.
  • Family Friday Movie Night, April 1 at 6 p.m. Enjoy some snacks and get comfortable at the library while watching the movie Encanto! Bring pillows and blankets from home so you can get cozy to watch on our big projector screen. Click here to register.

This month’s make-and-take crafts are a leprechaun trap for the wee ones, origami star garland for teens and a decorated plant stake for adults. All crafts are available on a first-come-first-served basis while supplies last.

The Webster Public Library is located at 980 Ridge Rd., at the back of Webster Plaza.


Your next two Webster-based opportunities to donate blood and help save lives happen in just a few weeks.

There are all sorts of incentives this month to get you to make a donation.

Donate at any blood drive in Webster this March for a chance to win a $50 Wegmans gift card. PLUS, give blood or platelets in March and get a $10 e-gift card from Fanatics! PLUS, get a chance to score a trip to the 2022 MLB All-Star Game in Los Angeles.


This notice from the folks at the Friends of Webster Trails, who have embarked on a program to save the trees of Webster.

The forests of Webster are under attack. Insects and disease are going after the ash, hemlock, oak, and beech. As they die, they will be replaced by invasive and most times non-native trees unless we do something.  

The Friends of Webster Trails has established a group to come up a plan and set it in motion.  ReTree – Replanting Our Native Forest aims to do just that. Tree surveys have been completed of many of our trail areas telling us what trees are present and their number.  You may have already noticed efforts to clear invasive plants along the Blue Trail in the Whiting Road Nature Preserve. In fall, potted trees of appropriate species will be purchased and planted in this area.  In spring, we will be building a tree nursery to grow native trees from seeds for future planting.  

Stay tuned for more information about this initiative.


Tickets are on sale now for Webster Thomas High School’s spring musical, Little Shop of Horrors.

Little Shop of Horrors is a sci-fi horror musical with a 1960s pop/rock score by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman. It tells the story of meek floral assistant Seymour Krelborn, who stumbles across a new breed of plant he names “Audrey II.” The egotistical, sweet talking R&B-singing carnivore promises unending fame and fortune to the down-and-out Krelborn as long as he keeps feeding it, BLOOD. Over time, though, Seymour discovers Audrey II’s out of this world origins and intent towards global domination.

Shows will be held Thursday, Friday and Saturday April 7, 8 and 9 at 7:30 p.m., and Saturday at 2 p.m. Reserve tickets are $12, or $10 for groups of ten or more. Click here to get yours.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster community mailbag

18 Feb

I’d like to start off today’s mailbag with a sweet item from Mary Alice Moore about a friend of hers, Eleanor Scott, who recently celebrated her 90th birthday.

Eleanor wanted to mark the occasion by going to Nick Tahoe’s. So she and her group of girlfriends — who often do things together — headed downtown last week to the restaurant. The group, as you might imagine, attracted the attention of Alex Tahoe himself, who came over to talk with the ladies. Upon learning it was Eleanor’s birthday, he gave her a t-shirt, facilitated photos in front of the sign (behind the serving counter!) and even walked them to the parking lot.

There’s a good chance you might know Eleanor; she’s very involved in the Webster Presbyterian Church and Young Life, and has taken several mission groups to Kenya. Make sure to wish her a happy birthday if you see her around town!

Thank you to Mary Alice for providing this story and photos. She’s in Florida right now and couldn’t attend the party, but was there in spirit, and the “girls” kept her updated throughout the entire event.


Blood donors critically needed

This recent spate of bad weather hasn’t just made driving difficult and closed schools. It’s also meant that the Red Cross has had to cancel blood drives. And that’s dealing a tough blow to the national blood supply, which has already been at crisis levels since early January.

The need for blood is constant and only volunteer donors can fulfill that need for patients in our community. Nationwide, someone needs a unit of blood every two to three seconds, and most of us will need blood in our lifetime.

Your next opportunity to donate in Webster is coming up on Tuesday March 1, in the recreation room at the Lighthouse Baptist Church, from noon to 5 p.m. The church is located at 48 South Estate Drive (that’s near the Summit Knolls apartment complex east of Webster Schroeder off of Shoecraft).

They’d love for you to make an appointment to assure social distancing. You can click here to do so. I also recommend you get in the habit of filling out the RapidPass on the morning of your donation; it saves a lot of time.

I’d ALSO recommend you download the Red Cross Blood Donor App, available on the App Store and Google Play. It’s a great tool to help schedule appointments, view your blood type and results of your mini-physical, and track your donations.


EXTRA EXTRA from the library

On Tuesday Feb. 23, the Webster Public LIbrary will host Deanne Quinn Miller and local author Gary Craig for a discussion of their new non-fiction book, The Prison Guard’s Daughter, and the events of the Attica Prison Riot, which marked its 50th anniversary last Sepetember.

Miller is uniquely qualified to tell this story. She’s the daughter of Correctional Officer William Quinn, the first casualty of the Attica Prison Riot. She’s also a member of Forgotten Victims of Attica, which provides counseling, has established an annual memorial at the prison, and in the last 20 years has secured $12 million in reparations for its members.

Here’s part of the book synopsis taken from Amazon.com:

On the 50th anniversary of America’s deadliest prison riot comes a prison-guard daughter’s quest to uncover the truth about her father’s murder during the uprising―a story of crossing racial divides, befriending inmates and correctional officers alike, and challenging the state to reveal and pay for its malfeasance.

Deanne Quinn Miller was five years old when her father―William “Billy” Quinn―was murdered in the first minutes of the Attica Prison Riot, the only corrections officer to die at the hands of inmates. But how did he die? Who were the killers? Those questions haunted Dee and wreaked havoc on her psyche for thirty years. Finally, when she joined the Forgotten Victims of Attica, she began to find answers. This began the process of bringing closure not only for herself but for the other victims’ families, the former prisoners she met, and all of those who perished on September 13, 1971―the day of the “retaking,” when New York State troopers and corrections officers at the Attica Correctional facility slaughtered twenty-nine rioting prisoners and ten hostages in a hail of gunfire.

The discussion will be held via Zoom on Tuesday Feb. 23 from 7 to 8 p.m. Registration is required, and once you do so, you’ll be sent the Zoom invitation. There’s no charge.

Penfield’s Annual “Indoor Hike” Scheduled for March

The Penfield Trails Committee will host its annual “Indoor Hike” on Saturday March 12 from 10 a.m. to noon at Penfield Town Hall, 3100 Atlantic Ave.

This unique event, held each year during the deep cold of the winter when the weather for outdoor hiking can be unfavorable, is a chance to explore and learn about nature and hiking-related topics in a lecture-style setting, with discussion time following the lecture.

This year’s topic is “Rewilding Local and Global Natural Habitats – A Sustainable Conservation Remedy,” presented by Penfield Trails Committee Chairman Nelson Carman. Mr. Carman will discuss ideas from environmentalist, author, and activist Paul Hawken on large-scale, practical remedies for reversing our climate crisis, as well as the concept of repairing and rewilding natural habitats on a global level from American biologist, naturalist, and writer E.O. Wilson. Discussion time will follow the lecture.

Hiking groups from other area towns and organizations will also be present with information about their groups and their 2022 schedules and events.

This event is free and open to the public. Participants are asked to please register here or by calling Penfield Recreation at (585) 340-8655.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster community mailbag, and happy birthday Webster

4 Feb

The Town of Webster is celebrating an anniversary on Sunday.

On Feb. 6, 1840, Governor William Seward announced the birth of the Town of Webster. Originally part of North Penfield, land was split off to create the new town after a petition with 324 signatures was presented to the NYS Assembly.

The name of Daniel Webster — a prominent lawyer, former U.S. Congressman and Secretary of State — was proposed for the new town after a group of citizens heard him give a speech in Rochester. (As far as I can tell he never actually stepped foot in the town.) The first town meeting was held at Lett’s Tavern, at the corner of Webster-Fairport and State Roads.

The Webster Museum (who provided the birthday announcement) has also sent along this tidbit in honor of Black History Month, about Asa Dunbar, one of the area’s earliest residents.

The search for information about the history of African-American people in Webster remains slow-going. A combination of factors complicate the search: record keeping and retention were not priorities in this area in the 18th century, and information about races other than white were not recorded on census forms. …

Asa Dunbar’s family came to Northfield around 1795 when Asa was 41 years old. He is credited with being the first black inhabitant of the Rochester area. At 6’7”, he was a trapper, an imposing figure who looked after the interests of the city of Tryon on the west side of Irondequoit Creek. Asa did not, so far as we know, reside in Webster, but did business here…. perhaps for the store, perhaps for himself. He sold fruit and salt from a salt spring near his home, and evidently also from salt springs in Webster along the bay. …

Research has turned up information about a few of Asa’s relatives as well, including his nephew, Asa Dunbar, Jr., who lived in the area until 1851; and another Asa Dunbar who was perhaps a grandson or nephew. According to an interview conducted on 1881, that Asa was named after “Asa Dunbar, an early settler of gigantic strength (who) frequented the place to manufacture salt.”

Yet another Asa — Asa Bass — was a pioneer who came to what would be Webster in 1812 along with other pioneers from Massachusetts. He was, so far as we know, the only black pioneer to arrive then and his family were likely the first black residents here. He was a farmer of some means and purchased at different times, three different properties between the northern sections of what are now Phillips Road and Route 250.

Information about these early African-American settlers is hard to come by, so the Webster Museum is hoping to hear from relatives of people who might have been friends or neighbors of the Dunbars and Basses. Any information, even the smallest clue, would be helpful. If you have anything to share, contact Kathy at ktaddeo5@icloud.com.

Red Cross Blood Drive

I know the Red Cross is always whining about blood shortages, but this time they’re serious. They’re facing their worst blood shortage in more than a decade, which means doctors are having to make difficult decisions about who receives transfusions and who can wait. Blood and platelet donations are needed now more than ever.

Your next opportunity to help save as many as three lives with a donation is this Monday Feb. 7 at Holy Trinity Church. The drive will be set up from 1 to 7 p.m. in the church’s community room. Click here to make an appointment.

Please.

February Fun at the Webster Public Library

Here’s a list of just some of the fun programs planned this month at the Webster Public Library:

T(w)een De-Stress Program, Thurs. Feb 24, 3 to 4:30 p.m. (in person). Teens grades 4 to 12 are welcome to make some stress-relieving toys. Cozy treats will be provided as well. Registration required.

Learn to Knit! Tuesdays Feb, 22 and March 1, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (in person). Learn the basics of knitting including reading patterns, casting on, knitting, purling, and binding off. Bring any smooth, “worsted”-weight yarn (labeled #4) and a pair of knitting needles, any size from 6 to 9. Teens and adults are welcome. Registration and attendance are required for both sessions.

This month’s make-and-take crafts are a Ladybug Valentine for the kids, Valentine’s Day Pom Pom Monsters for teens, and a Yarn-wrapped Wire Word for adults. Materials are free and available first-come-first-served at the Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd. (at the rear of Webster Plaza).

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

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Webster community mailbag

3 Jan

Today’s community mailbag is brought to you by the Webster Museum and the Webster Public Library.

The folks at the museum have announced the 2021 Festival of Trees winners. The two trees receiving the most votes (which were tallied in person and online) were for Saunders family’s Lego creations in the children’s division, and the Webster Quilt Guild’s handmade fabric creations in the adult division.

While we’re talking trees, don’t throw out that small artificial tree that you don’t want anymore. Several of the museum’s Festival of Trees trees are showing their age and need to be replaced. If you have a 3.5 or 4-foot tree which you can donate, email Kathy at ktaddeo5@icloud.com.

So many things happening at the library

A huge Webster welcome to Adam Traub, the Webster Public Library’s new director, who began his tenure this week. It’s actually a homecoming for Adam, who’s a Webster native with a lot of library experience. I chatted with him several weeks ago and came away very impressed by his enthusiasm and passion. Read that blog here.


Remember when I got to display a bunch of my blog photos on the library’s Artist’s Wall? (You can see them all here, by the way.) Well, now here’s YOUR chance.

The Webster Public Library is looking for artists to exhibit their work on the wall. Each artist — painter, illustrator, photographer, quilter, whomever — gets an entire month for their exhibit. If you’re interested in applying, click here to read the Artist’s Wall policy and here for the application.


The creative ways the library finds to encourage learning continue to amaze me.

Here’s their latest: they’re called “experience kits,” and like everything else, you can borrow them. Each kit is a collection of items — including books, DVDs and/or supplies — which help you learn a new skill. There are LOTS of kits, encompassing crafts, science, sports, and lots more.

For example, the Cake Decorating Kit has The Complete Guide to Cake Decorating book, a turntable, decorating tips, spatulas, icing smoothers and a pastry bag; the Ghost Hunting Kit has two books, Ghost Hunting for Beginners and Chilling Tales of Rochester’s Past, plus an EMF meter, flashlight and dousing rods; and the Microscope Kit has a microscope and carrying case, plus blank slides and prepared slides.

Click here to see the entire list of kits.


Here are this month’s special events at the library:

  • Make a felt gnome at January’s monthly craft night, Monday Jan. 10 from 6 to 7 p.m. (in person). All materials will be provided. Teens in grades 4-12 and adults are welcome. There’s no cost, but registration is required. Click here to register.
  • Learn how to make a bullet journal. A bullet journal is a cross between a planner, to-do list, a diary, and anything in between. Sarah Dennison will host a Zoom-based class Tuesday Jan. 11 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. to tell you all about it and get you started. Adults and teens are welcome. Registration is required.
  • The library will provide the supplies, you bring the creativity to Bad Art Night and make some crazy art on Friday Jan. 28 from 6 to 7 p.m. (in person). Teens grade 4-12 are welcome. Click here to register.

January’s make-and-take crafts look like a ton of fun, too.

For kids, there’s a fortune cookie craft. For teens, paper spinners, and for adults, a puzzle piece picture frame. All materials are provided. You just gotta stop by the library to pick them up!

The Webster Public Library is located at 980 Ridge Rd., at the back of Webster Plaza.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Webster Public Library’s mitten tree — and other library news

11 Dec

Count on the Webster Public Library to really get revved up for the holidays. Everytime I go to their Facebook page I see they’ve added something new and fun.

Let’s start with the “mitten tree.” It’s in the main lobby, awaiting donations of mittens and other cold-weather gear to donate to Hope House.

Donations will be accepted through Jan. 13, and everything will remain in our community, shared with Webster residents.

The Friends of the Library have also set up their holiday book sale, and when I saw it, I was floored by the selection and how downrigth PRETTY the display is.

Hardcover books cover a variety of topics including art, history, travel, cooking, sports, science, performing arts and more, and are just $2 to 4.

Now, let’s talk MUSIC. Two great family-pleasing, live musical performances are on tap. The first features the Roc City Ringers, performing today, Saturday Dec. 11 from 2 to 3 p.m. Then, the following Thursday Dec. 16, the Webster Thomas Select Choir takes to the risers for a beautiful vocal concert from 2:30 to 3:15 p.m.

Neither of these events requires pre-registration, but please remember to mask up!

Finally, when you’re at the library for the book sale, concerts, or to drop off your donations to the mitten tree, maake sure to stop by the Artist’s Wall, where this month’s installation features the Arbor Creek Photo Group.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

Meet Adam Traub, the Webster Public Library’s new director

7 Dec

As the Webster Public Library welcomes the new year, it will also welcome a brand new director.

On January 3, Adam Traub will officially take over as director for Terri Bennett, who’s retiring after more than 40 years of service.

Traub is currently Associate Director of the Monroe County Library System (MCLS), where he manages the operations of the county’s 20-member library system. Before joining the MCLS, he worked for several years in academia, managing digital and technology services at the University of Rochester and RIT libraries.

A graduate of Nazareth College, Traub didn’t originally plan to pursue a career in the library sciences.

“I was initially going to teach English at the collegiate or high school level,” he said. But then when a snafu at the college postponed his student teaching placements, he saw it as an opportunity to explore a different direction.

“I’d been working in the library (work study) for the past three years, and I really liked it,” he said. “So I decided to get my master’s in library science. I’ll get that, and when I’m done, I’ll see what jobs are available.”

Plus, he added, “I didn’t have to grade, which was very attractive.”

He headed to the University of Buffalo for his MLS and never looked back.

“I have no regrets,” he said. “I’ve found a way to make a living giving things away. … It’s amazing.” 

In accepting the position at the Webster Public Library, Traub is basically coming home. He grew up in Webster, graduated from Webster High School in 1999, and still has family here in town. He and his wife Rachel recently moved to Williamson from the South Wedge and are expecting their first child in March.

Traub hasn’t met all of the staff members yet, but is pretty impressed by what he’s seen so far. He said,

The thing that comes through the first time you walk in this building is the creativity of the staff. When I started my current position (with the MCLS) I visited every single public library location in Monroe County. Staff across the county are amazing. But the creativity here…

When I started, when I came to Webster, they were just putting up their hallway decorations. And right there, there was a giant tree made of paper, it went all the way up. … That’s like a professional level exhibit type thing and I was just floored. …When you go to library school, you don’t get taught any of that. That’s someone’s interest and skill and passion coming out. 

I see really cool things happening with tech, I see really creative use of space which is a whole other skill set. Obviously they’re doing something right. They’re one of the busiest suburban libraries in the county, and not the biggest by population.

I think in some ways, Webster’s swinging above its weight class. 

Fans of the library have nothing to fear; Traub isn’t planning to make a whole lot of sweeping changes right away. His first priority is to get the lay of the land.

I would feel awfully arrogant if I said I had big plans for the library to change. There will be change but right now I think it’s figuring out, what do the staff and the patrons love? What should keep going? Because I find that those cultural touchstones are the most important things for us to keep. 

So my first little bit is getting to know what needs to stay before we start thinking about what needs to change. I think having a healthy amount of humility is important to know what’s important to people and make sure what needs to stay stays, and then figure out what’s not working. 

To that end, Adam hopes to set up a public meet-and-greet before the end of the year. “Terri’s done such an amazing job here, I’m sure people want to know the library’s in good hands.”

Stay tuned for more information about that.

The Webster Public Library is located at 980 Ridge Rd., at the back of Webster Plaza.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@missyblog)

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.