Tag Archives: Webster NY

First Responders 5K returns to the village

11 Aug

I like participating in 5Ks. (You’ll notice I didn’t say “run” 5Ks, because the pace I set cannot actually be called “running.”) So I’m really looking forward to one of my favorite 5Ks ever, the First Responders 5K.

This is a favorite for a few reasons. First, it’s in the Village of Webster. I can walk to the start line AND it runs right by my house. Second, SO MANY of my Webster friends also run. And finally, some of the proceeds benefit a great cause.

The race website explains,

The First Responders 5K recognizes the strength, perseverance, and courage of police officers, firefighters, EMTs, 911 operators and their families in our local community.

First responders put their lives on the line for us every day as they face hardships that most of us will never know. The repetitive negative experience of stressful and potentially traumatic events that first responders face on a daily basis leaves them particularly vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder. We hope that this event can raise awareness for PTSD in first responders, and raise funds for a local charity, FRST Agency, that will provide support, awareness, assets, and services to first responders seeking assistance in dealing with the effects of PTSD.

A portion of proceeds, as well as 100% of additional donations, will be donated to the FRST Agency

The race is scheduled for Friday Sept. 2 at 6:30 p.m. It will BEGIN AND END at the south side of Fireman’s Field on Sanford St., and take racers through east-side village neighborhoods. Cost is $30 ($35 after Aug. 14), or $15 for active first responders. Each racer will also receive a t-shirt, and food and drink after the race.

My family will once again be setting up our “refreshment” stop on Fuller Ave., with water — and beer — so watch for our signs!

To register for the race, and for more information including a course map, click here . They’re also looking for volunteers, which is an easy gig and nets you a t-shirt, too. You can also find out more about that opportunity on the website.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/11/2022)

Miracle Field is having a birthday party!

10 Aug

You’ve heard me sing the praises of Rochester Challenger Miracle Field many times here in this blog. If you haven’t visited this tremendous facility yet, there’s a party coming up that’ll be a great chance to do so.

Believe it or not, it was a full five years ago that Miracle Field officially opened its gates, the culmination of many years of planning and hard work. Since then, the field and its dedicated team of volunteers have brought the pure joy of sports and teamwork to hundreds of Challenger athletes.

In celebration of this big anniversary, Miracle Field is having a Birthday Bash. On Thursday Aug. 18 the community is invited to cheer on the Challenger players as they compete in a friendly kickball game. While you’re there, you can check out the field, the pavilion and the wheelchair-accessible Karpus Family Playground. There’ll be music, food and refreshments, a raffle and more.

Tickets for the party are $15 per person or $40 for the family. They must be purchased ahead of time. Click here for information.

Rochester Challenger Miracle Field is located on Ridge Road behind Town Hall. It’s designed for individuals with physical and/or cognitive challenges and is fully wheelchair accessible. It offers children and adults with developmental, physical or intellectual disabilities a barrier-free, safe, accessible place to experience the health benefits and joy of play through baseball, other team sports, and adaptive recreational equipment.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/10/2022)

Webster man may be first ultra runner with Spina Bifida

9 Aug

Anyone who runs, even short distances, knows that running isn’t always easy. Too often, pounding the pavement means pushing through mental barriers, blisters and sore muscles.  

But that all pales compared to the challenges Mike Fitzsimmons has had to overcome. 

Mike Fitzsimmons was born on January 26, 1986 with myelomeningocele, the most serious type of Spina Bifida. His spine had not fused completely, and there was an open wound in his back where spinal fluid was leaking out. His parents were told that if their son lived, he’d be severely disabled, in a wheelchair and have no quality of life. Within 48 hours he had surgery to close the wound, but Mike’s chances of ever walking were still very slim.

But sometimes miracles happen. Today, 36 years later, Mike Fitzsimmons is not only walking, but is running ultra marathons, and so far is the only known person with Spina Bifida to do so. 

Mike was fortunate; all his life he’s had normal feeling in his feet, knees and ankles, and led an active childhood, playing sports of all kinds. But he didn’t become a runner until much later, when life started to turn very sour.

When he was 19 years old, Mike’s mother developed early-onset Alzheimer’s, and he became her caregiver. She passed away ten years later. 

“When she died, I was so lost and broken. I needed to do something,” he remembered. “I hated running, (but) I didn’t want to take Xanax, or get into drugs or booze. I thought, let’s just try this stupid running stuff everyone’s taking about.” 

For a while the running-as-therapy worked, at least a little bit. Then two years later, his best friend took his own life, and that made matters worse. He started running even longer distances. 

By the time COVID hit in 2020, running had become an important part of Mike’s life.  Setting a personal challenge to run a half marathon seemed like a natural next step, and a great way to get through the pandemic. To make it more interesting, he’d also journal about his experience on Instagram. 

“I didn’t even know what a hashtag was at that point,” he said. “I’m in my mid-30s, no one cares about what some middle-aged dude is doing, trying to figure out how to run a silly half marathon. But it was going to be cool for me. Like, Spina Bifida, half marathon, let’s see what it becomes.” And anyway, he thought, “no one’s going to find it.” 

Boy, was he wrong. 

The Instagram account started to blow up, drawing followers from both the disabled and long distance running communities. His fans cheered him on as he trained for and eventually completed the virtual 2021 Buffalo half-marathon, running the 13.1 miles through his neighborhood. He credits them – and his wife Amelia – for keeping him going.

Having accomplished that goal, he decided to take a break and ignore the Instagram account for a while. But he started to miss all of the friends he’d made there. So, with their encouragement, he signed up for the Mind the Ducks 12-hour ultra marathon, held in May at North Ponds Park, setting an ambitious goal of 50K (31 miles). 

Mike still has chronic problems with his kidneys and bladder, which makes managing hydration a serious concern and requires some extra preparation and precautions.  Despite that however, he finished his 50K – actually, 32.48 miles – in just over 7.5 hours. 

It may very well be the first time anyone with Spina Bifida has completed an ultra marathon. 

As the story of Mike’s running achievements has spread, he’s created a unique and inspirational connection between the running community and the disabled community. It’s a role he didn’t go looking for, but has come to embrace. He’s now determined to spread the word about the amazing things children and adults can accomplish, even with a disability.  

He especially wants to help change the negative perceptions medical professionals continue to have about the prognosis for those born with Spina Bifida.

“It bugs me that it’s still the narrative (for doctors and nurses) nearly 40 years later… I would just love it if a mom heard, ‘Yeah it might be really bad, but what if it’s really good? What if it’s amazing? What if they’re in a wheelchair, but maybe they’ll cure cancer?’” 

What he’s accomplished, he said, is a good example. “It just shows that you can do anything, be anyone.” 

“I don’t want to be ‘Mike the Spina Bifida Guy’ who runs crazy runs forever. It’s cool that it’s a part of it. But I also like music and hanging out with my wife.” 

A diagnosis of Spina Bifida does not have to define a person, he added. “There’s so many awesome aspects to all of us.”

* * * 

Mike Fitzsimmons isn’t slowing down yet. He’s already training hard for his next ultra, the 100-mile Dreadmill 48-hour Endurance Challenge in December. Matter of fact, the day before I talked with him he’d run a half-marathon. That’s 13 miles. With a broken toe. 

He’s using Dreadmill Challenge as a fundraiser for one of his favorite causes, Bella’s Bumbas, a Webster-based nonprofit dedicated to building miniature wheelchairs for children with a wide variety of mobility issues, including Spina Bifida. (Read more about them here.) 

You can follow Mike’s running journey, and read more inspirational stories, on his Instagram page (@mikecanrun). And if you’d like to throw your support behind his efforts, and support the incredible work that Bella’s Bumbas is doing, check out Mike’s GoFundMe page.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/9/2022)

A bit of history about the History Bit

5 Aug

My regular blog readers are familiar with the monthly “Bit of Webster History” features, courtesy the Webster Museum, which I will often post.

In recent months, topics have run the gamut from famous people (like Merton Lewis and Esther Dunn) and monsters at the museum to the history of Ridge Rd. and the Forest Lawn neighborhood. I even saw one from a while ago about hanging laundry.

For the last six years, these fascinating historical nuggets have been researched and written by Webster Museum volunteer Kathy Taddeo, who this month has put the spotlight on the Bits themselves.

She wrote,

“(The) March 4, 1938 edition of the Webster Herald was one of the first issues to carry the column we now know as ‘A Bit of Webster History.’ This means the column has been part of the Herald for 84 of its 123 years, written by historians and museum volunteers for the enjoyment of Herald readers.”

Here’s a look at the column from that day, from New York Historic Newspapers:

Kathy’s a great writer and I’ve always enjoyed seeing what little historical surprises she manages to dig up. But after six years, Kathy has decided to hand the Bit of Webster History reins to someone else, who will take over beginning next month and continue the long tradition.

So let’s all have a round of applause for Kathy’s great work, and stay tuned in the next several weeks to see who’ll be trying to fill her very capable shoes. (Some of you might be able to guess who that will be.)

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/5/2022)

Webster community mailbag

3 Aug

I open this week’s mailbag with a plug for the St. Rita Fiesta, happening this weekend at St. Rita Church in West Webster.

This is a lovely little festival, complete with carnival games, basket raffles, a sweet treats booth, food trucks, inflatables, a used book sale, chicken barbecue and more. Click here to see the Fiesta’s Facebook page and learn more.

The St. Rita Fiesta will take place Friday and Saturday Aug. 5 and 6 from 5 to 9 p.m. both nights, at 1008 Maple Drive in Webster.


The annual Webster Baptist Yard Sale also happens this weekend, Friday Aug. 5 from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday Aug. 6 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The church is located at 59 South Ave. in the village of Webster.


The next Webster Marching Band Bottle and Can Drive is coming up on Saturday Aug. 13.

This is a really easy way to help out our State Champion Webster Marching Band, and clean out your garage at the same time. All you have to do is place your bags of recyclables at the end of the driveway on Saturday morning (a little note indicating they’re for the band might be good), and they’ll be whisked away for a good cause.

Or, if you plan to be out and about on Saturday, you can drop them off at the collection site, Webster Schroeder High School, 875 Ridge Road, by 4 p.m.

OR, you can call the Bottle and Can Hotline (234-8684, option 1) ANYTIME to arrange a pickup at a time convenient for you.

PLUS …

Marrk your calendars now for the Webster Marching Band Food Truck Rodeo, Tuesday Aug. 23 from 4 to 8 p.m. at the Webster Firemen’s Field. I hope to get more details about this soon, but I know in the past these events have had as many as a dozen or more food trucks, live music, face painting and fire trucks. Stay tuned.


When you’re out and about in the next few weeks picking up school supplies, please consider throwing a few extras in your cart to help out Webster HOPE.

Webster HOPE is currently collecting supplies for their Back to School Night on Tuesday Aug. 16, when the supplies will be distributed to Webster students in need. Check out the poster to see the wish list of supplies. They can be dropped off at the Webster Public Library, or at Webster HOPE, 1450 Ridge Rd., during their open hours Monday 5-7, Tuesday 10-noon, Wednesday 3-5 and Thursday 5 to 7.


The Webster Aquatic Center pool will be closed from Aug. 8 to 26 for some scheduled maintenance. During the closing, the pool at Webster Thomas High School will be available on a limited basis. Times will be posted on the Aquatic Center calendar.

One million gallons of water will be drained from the Aquatic Center pool so that workers can clean it and change the filter media before refilling it and bringing it up again to a comfortable temperature.


The 4th annual Heroes and Hidden Heroes charity event is scheduled for Sunday Aug. 14 from 2 to 8 p.m. at Webster Firemen’s Field.

The event features dinner and live entertainment. Tickets are $20 presale before Aug. 7, $30 afterwards and at the door. Get your tickets at onesoldieratatime.net.


Your next opportunity to be a hero and save up to three lives by donating blood is right around the corner.

On Friday Aug. 19 from noon to 5:30 p.m., the Lighthouse Bible Baptist Church, 48 S. Estate Drive in Webster, will host a Red Cross blood drive in the church’s recreation room.

There’ll be food, drinks, t-shirts, and a chance to win some cool raffle prizes. Click here to make an appointment.

This blood drive is being sponsored by The Steam Police, who have provided the following inspirational story:

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/3/2022)

Calling all Buffalo Bills fans!

1 Aug

The Bills are back in town, the Bills are back in town!

The Buffalo Bills training camp is underway for the next few weeks at St. John Fisher College, and here in Webster, Whimsies gift shop on East Main Street is welcoming them back to town — and revving up the excitement for the upcoming season — with a Let’s Go Buffalo! Family Night on Thursday Aug. 4.

From 5 to 7 p.m. Whimsies will have the entire shop set up with Buffalo-themed games, including ping pong, Connect 4, washer toss, cornhole, and more. Carl’s Pizza will be selling pizza, wings, drinks and desserts, and Cassano Studios will provide music, so get ready to sing your favorite stadium songs, ’cause you you know that the Bills make you wanna SHOUT! (Sorry, no table-smashing this time around.)

This is a great family event, so get out all your Bills gear, bring your appetite, and come on down to the village Thursday night to cheer on our “hometown” team! Let’s get this season started!

Whimsies is located at 32 E. Main St. in Webster village.

(The Bills are practicing that day at Fisher … maybe one of them will hear about all the fun and pay us a visit? C’mon JOSH!!)

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 8/1/2022)


Goat Yoga at the Bowen Family Farm: a new spin on an ancient art

31 Jul

At the Bowen Family Farm on Lake Road, yoga has gone to the goats.

You can find yoga classes pretty much anywhere. I’ve seen classes held outdoors in parks, at breweries, in a greenhouse, even accompanied by dogs. But The Bowen Family Farm has come up with a twist that I’d never seen before.

It’s called Goat Yoga. Basically, it’s your normal yoga class, complete with all of the yoga poses we know and love. But while you’re moving through your cat/cow, there’s a good chance that a goat or two might wander by to see what you’re up to.

For a typical Goat Yoga class at the farm, owner Linda Bowen coaxes two of her six goats onto the floor to wander among the students (and sometimes adds rabbits and kittens to the mix). She’ll choose two of the smaller goats, since lying on a yoga mat just inches from the horned animals might be intimidating for someone who’s not familiar with them.

A frequent question Linda gets is if the goats will jump on the students’ backs. That actually doesn’t happen. At least not anymore.

“When the goats were babies, they did jump on our backs,” Linda said. “Now they’re just sort of a distraction.” But that’s actually a good thing, she added. Learning how to center yourself and tune out life’s distractions is a big part of the practice of yoga. She does have to remind everyone at the beginning of every class, however, that sometimes the goats think students are fellow goats and might greet them with a friendly, albeit unexpected, head butt.

That not-getting-distracted part was rather difficult for some of the students in last Saturday morning’s class, which was made up mostly of (human) kids, many of whom had never done yoga before. The adorable bunnies hopping around and goats meandering in between the mats proved too cute to ignore for some of the students, who, as the class began, seemed as interested in petting the friendly animals as they were downward dog … ing. 

The yoga “studio” itself is actually in an old 1860’s barn, where Linda has cleared out enough floor space to accommodate up to 18 yoga mats. Once all of the mats are in place, she makes sure to fence off the doorway so the goats can’t escape, then spreads treats around the room so the goats will visit everyone. Once the class begins, it doesn’t take long for both students and animal helpers to get into the flow of things.

“The goats are a little ‘off’ in the beginning,” Linda said, “(but) by the end they start sleeping on somebody’s mat. They’re relaxed and chill out and are very happy.” 

And after all, that’s what the whole yoga experience is about.

One good thing about COVID, Linda said, “was that it slowed life down and it brought us back to basics, and that’s what I think this is to me. The yoga practice is trying to bring you back, slow your pace and focus within, and not so much on the external stuff.”

Goat Yoga is held at the Bowen Family Farm, 833 Lake Rd., every Saturday morning through August at 9 a.m. Space is limited, so visit their Facebook page for more information and to register.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 7/31/2022)

Remember Village Days? It’s coming back (sort of)

29 Jul

Those great folks at the Webster Business Improvement District (BID) have just in the last two weeks started to pull together a new summer event, and they want to spread to the word to get everyone involved.

It’s basically going to be a street fair, featuring businesses, vendors, snacks, crafts and perhaps a few games, very reminiscent of the old Village Days of yore.

The fair will be held on Friday August 19, on the first night of the Webster Jazz Fest. That evening is “Jazz in the Pubs,” when six different bands will be performing at six different bars and restaurants in town (more details about that in a future blog). West Main Street will already be closed for the evening, so it’s a perfect time to hold a Village-Days-type street fair.

Now, however, the BID needs vendors and contributors. They’re pretty much open to any ideas, so if you’ve got a village business and would like to participate, email the Webster BID at info@websterbid.com and get on board!

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 7/29/2022)

Webster community mailbag

19 Jul

I’d like to start today with this very interesting History Bit from the Webster Museum, which tells a bit of history of the Forest Lawn neighborhood, on the very northern end of town.

WATER, WATER EVERYWHERE!

(submitted by Kathy Taddeo)

Webster is very fortunate in its location. Not only is it bordered by Lake Ontario on its north and Irondequoit Bay on its West, but it is blessed with numerous creeks and streams. All add color, texture, sound and wildlife to our daily lives.

It’s not surprising, then, that waterfront property has been prized since Webster’s pioneer days and that there are several cottage enclaves along lake, bay and streams. One of these is Forest Lawn on Lake Ontario and Shipbuilders Creek.

By 1857, friends Samuel Pierce and John Forsyth had completed a plan for a summer community in the northwest corner of Webster. Later, Horace Pierce and George Forsyth talked the local trolley company into extending its line so residents could hop a trolley after work and meet their families at the community known as Forest Lawn. The definitive history of Forest Lawn was written by yet another Forsyth, Judge C. Benn. His FOREST LAWN 1888-1988 is available to read at the Webster Museum library and to borrow from the Webster Public Library.

By 1888, the Forest Lawn Club was incorporated, the cottage lots claimed and the clubhouse had become the center of social activity. The clubhouse burned down for the second time in 1908 and never rebuilt. However, the spirit of community was strong and for many years, the neighbors carried on the Forest Lawn Field Day with croquet and softball and dancing behind the store. One Forest Lawn song was sung to the tune of “Harrigan.”
     F-O-R-E-S-T-L-A-W-N, Forest Lawn
     That’s the place we like to praise, sir.
     That’s the spot which we most craze sir.
      F-O-R-E-S-T-L-A-W-N, Forest Lawn
     Ring the bell, let it swell
     Wake the echoes through lawn and dell –
      Forest Lawn, that’s here!

Around 1914-1918, Isabella and Thomas Dorsey rented a home in a Forest Lawn farm, likely the Glasser farm. There they cared for orphaned African-American children. Their neighbors commented that the Dorseys were doing “excellent work.”  In need of more space, the Dorseys moved the children to the current site of McQuaid High School.

Around this time, residents apparently could not get enough of their summer place and seasonal cottages became permanent dwellings. Forest Lawn turned into a neighborhood and a hamlet with its own post office. Though likely few remember much less sing the old field day songs, Forest Lawn remains one of the many beautiful places to live in Webster, New York.

The Webster Museum’s map collection, which sparked this “Bit of Webster History,” is available to you on Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2-4:30 pm at 18 Lapham Park.


The Caring Community Concert series at the United Church of Christ (570 Klem Rd.) is back, and this summer’s lineup is a great one.

These concerts benefit local nonprofit organizations through free-will donations. The first one, scheduled for Wed. July 20 will feature the Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra, and proceeds will benefit Meals on Wheels.

The next concert, on Wed. July 27, features the Gate Swingers Big Band, with proceeds going to the Webster Public Library BookBox. The last, on Wed. Aug. 3, features 8 Days a Week, and will benefit the Webster Community Chest.

The concerts all begin at 6:30 p.m., and food concessions begin at 6. You can bring a picnic or buy dinner or snacks there, served up by church volunteers. The concerts are held on the United Church of Christ front lawn, at 570 Klem Rd. (In case of rain it’s moved indoors.) Bring your own lawn chairs and come enjoy some great music for a good cause!

For more information about the concerts, click here.


Fun stuff coming up in the village in the next few weeks.

  • The Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra comes to the Veterans’ Park gazebo this Friday July 22 for a concert beginning at 7 p.m.
  • The next Family Games and Beer Garden Night is Friday July 29 from 6 to 9 p.m. Plans are to introduce even more games for the older kids this time around.
  • On Friday Aug. 5, It’s My Party will perform at the gazebo, beginning at 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday Aug. 9 is the next Movie in the Park, featuring Flight of the Navigator

And that’s only the beginning. There are more bands, the Jazz Fest, another movie, another Games Night … and you can check out details about all of these on the Webster BID website.


Don’t forget about the Joe Obbie Farmers’ Market’s latest addition: the Evening in the Park market at Charles Sexton Park (formerly North Ponds) every Wednesday from 4 to 8 p.m. Lots of vendors, food trucks, and live music. So don’t just come ro shop for great crafts, flowers and fresh vegetables; bring some lawn chairs and make an evening out of it.

Check out the poster below for information about the entertainers.


Finally, you don’t want to miss this great event coming up at Miracle Field on Saturday July 23, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

It’s Hero’s Day, when Challenger athletes take the field to play some ball games with — and against — our first responders. There’s lots of refreshments, a dunk tank, kids’ obstacle course, and baseball games all morning. Your kids will also get to meet many of our first responders and check out some of their equipment.

There’s no charge, but there’s plenty of fun and excitement.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 7/19/2022)

Beautiful music has returned to Harmony Park

16 Jul

After almost two years of not being able to play together at their regular summer gigs at Harmony Park, the Webster Village Band is back together and performing beautiful music again.

Like pretty much everything else, in the last two years the pandemic put a damper on the Village Band’s ability to perform publicly, or even rehearse. Not only were their Thursday evening concerts at the Harmony Park bandshell cancelled entirely, they weren’t even allowed into the schools to hold rehearsals.

Last summer, as the pandemic began to wane, the band was able to rehearse again at the Harmony Park bandshell on Phillips Rd., and towards the end of last year actually had two performances, one at the park and another at the Village of Webster’s 9/11 memorial ceremony.

“When we got together the first time last year, you could tell the people were hungry to play,” said conductor Tom Indiano. “It was an awesome, awesome experience.” 

When they weren’t able to meet, especially over the winter months when they couldn’t hold outdoor rehearsals, “it was difficult,” Indiano said. “People want to play music.” So they did their best to stay busy in other ways, rehearsing at home, having social hours on Zoom, and finding creative ways to continue doing what they love doing most — making music.

Last December, for example, they pulled together a virtual, multi-instrumental performance of Sleigh Ride by Leroy Anderson, which you can see below.

“We sent out parts,” Indiano remembered, and “everyone did a recording of it.” Then the individual parts were collected and expertly compiled into one seamless performance by one of the band’s members.

The piece was extremely well received, even attracting the attention of Anderson’s family, who thanked the band for the beautiful rendition.

Only a few months ago was the band finally allowed to hold their rehearsals in the schools again. So the season got off to a late start, but the Village Band is definitely back, albeit with a few changes.

Right now, “We’re just trying to get our feet wet,” Indiano said. “There’re some new tunes we’re working on.”

“We lost some people in that two-year span,” he added. “We’re a little smaller, but we’re pretty strong and there’s new blood coming in.”

“The future looks very good.”

The Webster Village Band plays on Thursday evenings at 7 p.m. at Harmony Park, on Phillips Rd., south of Ridge. The next two concerts are Aug. 11 and Aug. 25. They’re free and open to the community. Bring a lawn chair and blanket and your own refreshments, then sit back and enjoy some beautiful music.

* * *

email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

You can also get email notifications every time I post a new blog by using the “Follow Me” link on the right side of this page.

(posted 7/16/2022)