Tag Archives: Webster Union Cemetery

Revolutionary War patriots, first responders, veterans, military honored

2 Aug

The sounds of fifes, drums and rifle volleys rang out from Webster Union Cemetery last Saturday morning when our local heroes, past and present, were honored at a solemn ceremony.

The 90-minute Thank You Celebration was kicked off in grand fashion when the Towpath Volunteers Fife & Drum Corps marched in, performing early-American tunes. Following the National Anthem, a rifle salute and Taps, the celebration began in earnest with the morning’s premier event, a plaque dedication honoring two local Revolutionary War veterans, Private Ebenezer Curtice and Quartermaster Sergeant Jonas Whiting.

Curtice and Whiting are both buried at Webster Union Cemetery, just steps from where the ceremony was taking place. The plaques, placed by the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, are affixed to large stones in front of the grave markers.

While the plaque dedication was the morning’s main event, several other recognitions followed in the well-organized celebration. Representatives from local government, Webster Police, Webster and West Webster fire departments, NEQALS, Webster EMS, the military, Blue Star Mothers and Gold Star Mothers stepped to the podium in turn to recognize and thank Webster’s founding fathers, veterans, first responders and active military.

Thank you to all of the organizations, businesses and individuals who made this beautiful event a success, and especially for Cemetery Historian Cherie Wood for all of her hard work.

Here are some more photos from the morning:

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(posted 8/2/2022)

Event will thank Revolutionary War patriots, veterans, first responders

20 Jul

Local history will come alive on Saturday morning July 30 when Webster Union Cemetery hosts a thank you celebration honoring Revolutionary War patriots, veterans, active military and first reponders.

The family-friendly event will feature the Towpath Volunteers Fire and Drum Corps performing early-American songs, and a musket salute honoring our local Revolutionary War patriots. Watch active servicemen fold flags and present them to descendants of our patriots, and hear stories about families who built our town.

This is a great opportunity for your kids to meet and have their photos taken with some of our local first responders and active military. Veterans from all branches of the service are encouraged to attend and receive the community’s thanks.

The event begins at 10 a.m. at Webster Union Cemetery, 345 Webster Rd., at the corner of Rt. 250 and Woodhull. It’s free to the public. Bring along a lawn chair and enjoy a morning filled with history and music!

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(posted 7/20/2022)

New historical marker erected in Webster Union Cemetery

12 Jun

Webster Union Cemetery got some long-overdue recognition last Wednesday with the unveiling of a brand new historic roadside sign.

The history of Webster Union Cemetery, located at the corner of Rt. 250 and Woodhull Rd., can be traced back to March of 1817, when the Whiting family lost their very young child, and a caring neighbor donated some land for the burial. In the following years, the cemetery became the resting place of Abram Foster, one of Webster’s earliest settlers, and members from many prominent Webster families.

Wednesday’s ceremony and the new historical sign, however, especially recognized that the cemetery is also the burial place of many patriots who fought for our country, including more than 600 veterans from the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, Civil War, World War I and II and the Korean War.

Cemetery president George Baker and Daughters of the American Revolution genealogist Cherie Wood led the ceremony, unveiling the sign before an audience of cemetery board members, local officials, business leaders, representatives from VFW Post 9483, active duty servicemen and others.

The sign is the result of almost two years of research by George Baker, Cherie Wood and Webster Town Historian Lynn Barton. It was made possible with support from the William G. Pomeroy Foundation, a Syracuse-based organization dedicated to helping communities celebrate local history and encourage historic preservation through the placement of historical markers.

With installation of the sign, Webster Union Cemetery will also be added to the National Registry of Historic Places.

On Saturday, July 30 at 10 a.m., community members are invited to participate in a Revolutionary War Patriot and Founding Fathers Celebration at the cemetery. Active servicemen, veterans and Webster first responders will be attending, and the the Towpath Fife and Drum Corp. will honor our Revolutionary War Patriots with popular and well-known songs. 

Mark your calendars now; this will be an event the entire family will enjoy. 

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram.

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(posted 6/12/2022)

Images from the Living History Tour

22 Sep

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I had a chance Saturday afternoon to pop by Webster Union Cemetery and catch the final half hour of the Living History Tour sponsored by the cemetery and the Webster Museum.

The event was an opportunity for local history buffs to “meet” and chat with several of Webster’s citizens from olden times, portrayed by museum volunteers. They included John Fielding Whiting, Charles and Sabrina Wright, Helen Tompkins, Mark Curtice, Mae Strowger Wright, Jennie Strowger Woodhull, and Abram and Patience Woodhull Foster.

The event’s organizers were positively giddy about how successful the day was. They estimated about 100 people — adults and children — visited the tour’s half dozen or so stops, taking photos and videos, and listening intently to the actors.

The gorgeous first-day-of-autumn weather might have had something to do with the large turnout, but I like to think there are simply a lot of people here in town who care about our local history. I’m sorry that I wasn’t able to attend the entire tour, but am hoping that the Webster Museum will consider doing another one of these next year.

By then, the volunteers’ voices will have rebounded, after their non-stop afternoon of talking.

Here’s a short slide show of some of those volunteers.

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History comes alive with cemetery tour

25 Aug

museum tour

Here’s a heads-up about a very interesting and educational event being held by the Webster Museum in a few weeks.

It’s a living history tour at Webster Union Cemetery (Rt. 250 at Woodhull Rd.) on Saturday September 22. From 1 to 4 p.m., you can tour the cemetery and get a chance to meet with many of Webster’s citizens from the past, played by museum volunteers.

The above photo is one example of the fascinating costumed interpreters you will meet. Minerva Strowger, granddaughter of Abram Foster, was one of Webster’s earliest settlers. Minerva (AKA Gwen Hoffman, Webster Museum volunteer) lived in Webster from 1830-1904. She was married to Charles Strowger and had two children, Johnny who died at age 14 and May. Minerva and her daughter May ran a boarding house on Lake Road, but May was most notable for establishing the hotel and restaurant that would become Hedges Nine Mile Point on the land she inherited from her mother.

Other personalities you can chat with include John Fielding Whiting, Charles and Sabrina Wright, Helen Tompkins, Mark Curtice, Mae Strowger Wright, Jennie Strowger Woodhull, and Abram and Patience Woodhull Foster.

What a neat way to learn about Webster’s history — I’m thinking the kids would even get something out of this presentation.

The tour, once again, will take place Saturday September 22, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Webster Union Cemetery, 345 Webster Road (Rt. 250 at Woodhull). A $5 donation would be appreciated.

And remember that history is front and center all the time at the Webster Museum, 18 Lapham Park in the village. The Museum is open on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 2 to 4:30 p.m.

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email me  at missyblog@gmail.com“Like” this blog on Facebook and follow me on Twitter and Instagram

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